Peter Forsberg: Should he stay or should he just go away?

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peterforsberg2.jpgThe other day we mentioned for you that Peter Forsberg (you remember him don’t you?) was looking to get healthy once again and trying to play for his Swedish team MoDo. We speculated a little bit about what that would do for the annual rumors of Forsberg returning to North America and giving the NHL one more go for old time sake and apparently we weren’t alone in doing so. Adrian Dater of the Denver Post opined about Foppa and got a little wistful for the Avalanche days of yore.

You always have to wish Foppa nothing but the best and hope the medical gods give him a break. Here’s hoping.

Question is: would the Avs want him back, if Foppa said he wanted to play in Denver? I’m sure the one guy they’d listen to, even in their youth movement, would be No. 21. Odds are probably higher he’d end up in Philly or New York or Washington, but you know Denver will always be where Foppa’s heart is.

It’d be a romance novel if it was written any sweeter than that. Of course, what fun would it be if there wasn’t someone taking the opposing view. Enter From The Rink’s Mike Chen who pens his own letter to Peter Forsberg kindly asking him to stay away.

I know you may feel like giving it one more try with Modo, but how many times have we heard this now? It’s not the way it’s supposed to be, but that’s the harsh reality of it. Despite being robbed by injuries, you’ve still got a hockey career that few can match. Is there a reason to give it one more chance? It can’t be money; you’ve never been the money-grubbing type and besides, you’ve certainly got plenty of it (despite that failed Crocs investment; we’ll just pretend that never happened). If it was money you were after, I’m sure your agent would be calling the KHL but that doesn’t seem to be happening.

So I’m sure it’s about personal pride and love of the game. But to us outsiders, love of the game means letting it go. Let us remember this Peter Forsberg, not the guy who kept hanging on. Let your legacy be the guy who won two Stanley Cups and dominated the league for much of the 1990s and early 2000s, not the guy who has become a running joke among hockey fans.

Running joke might sound a bit harsh but after going through this routine each of the last few years with Peter Forsberg, it stings with the truth. Forsberg was a great player, and a polarizing one. You either loved his skills and ability to score at will or you despised him for his ability to sneak in a cheap hit or take a dive to get a call. Love him or hate him, the guy was other-worldly talented. Now he’s a guy with a perpetually injured foot who saw his career shortened because of nagging injuries.

Forsberg did give it another go during the past Olympics in Vancouver and seemed to be more of a hindrance to his Swedish line mates than a helper. If he couldn’t blend in well with the likes of Henrik Zetterberg and Daniel Alfredsson, what’s he going to do when playing the pivot on a line with say Alexander Semin, Marian Gaborik or Claude Giroux? Chances are he’d have a hard time keeping up with those guys and with the way the NHL is played now, the chances of Forsberg getting re-injured here are sky high. It’s probably best that Forsberg sit this one out, at least in the NHL, because turning into the bizarro Brett Favre is probably not how anyone imagined Peter Forsberg’s legacy turning out.

Wild lose Scandella to lower-body injury

ST PAUL, MN - OCTOBER 15: Marco Scandella #6 of the Minnesota Wild skates after the puck against Winnipeg Jets during the game on October 15, 2016 at Xcel Energy Center in St Paul, Minnesota. (Photo by Hannah Foslien/Getty Images)
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Ryan Suter may be in for a long night, at least if the first period of the Minnesota Wild – Buffalo Sabres game is any indication.

Suter logged 11 minutes of ice time in that opening frame after fellow defenseman Marco Scandella suffered a lower-body injury. The Wild aren’t certain if he’ll be able to come back in the game.

Onlookers believe that Scandella got hurt while he was tangled up with Nicolas Deslauriers of the Sabres.

Scandella is averaging a little under 20 minutes per game so far this season, so the Wild have to hope that this is just a minor issue.

Welcome Lindholm: Ducks send Theodore, Etem to AHL

LOS ANGELES, CA - SEPTEMBER 28:  Shea Theodore #53 of the Anaheim Ducks skates during a preseason game against the Los Angeles Kings at Staples Center on September 28, 2016 in Los Angeles, California.  (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
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The Anaheim Ducks finally hammered out a (sweet) deal with Hampus Lindholm, so now it comes down to some housekeeping.

Specifically, it means sending some fairly useful players with significant pedigrees down to the AHL on Thursday. The team announced that both Shea Theodore and Emerson Etem are bound for the San Diego Gulls.

Theodore, the 26th pick back in 2013, contributed a pretty assist to the Ducks’ 6-1 shellacking of the Nashville Predators last night:

It’s a cool story that Etem returned to the franchise that selected him 29th overall in 2010, yet he’s struggled to really find a niche in the NHL so far. At 24, there’s still time, though he likely feels a little anxious to become a full-time guy at the top level.

TSN’s Pierre LeBrun notes that Shea Theodore is likely to be on LTIR for “the foreseeable future,” which means that the Ducks aren’t forced to move Cam Fowler.

That’s great news for the Ducks. For Theodore in particular? The situation is not so great.

Red Wings will likely be without red-hot Vanek tonight

TAMPA, FL - OCTOBER 13:  Thomas Vanek #62 of the Detroit Red Wings gets ready for a face-off against Tampa Bay Lightning during a game at the Amalie Arena on October 13, 2016 in Tampa, Florida. (Photo by Mike Carlson/Getty Images)
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With a whopping 30.8 shooting percentage, a lot of things have gone Thomas Vanek‘s way since he joined the Detroit Red Wings. Thursday bucks that trend.

Puck luck isn’t what went away for Vanek; instead, he’s gotten a bad break with a lower-body injury that is expected to sideline him during tonight’s game against the St. Louis Blues.

The Detroit Free Press’ Helene St. James pegs it as possibly being a groin injury or hip flexor. The Detroit News’ Ted Kulfan leaves more toward it being a groin issue.

With eight points during his first seven games with Detroit, Vanek’s been a revelation, but that redemption story is now paused. It sounds like Justin Abdelkader will return to the lineup for the Red Wings, so maybe it isn’t all bad news for Detroit.

Alzner: Capitals’ playoff letdown is ‘deep somewhere in our heads’

PITTSBURGH, PA - MAY 10:  Sidney Crosby #87 of the Pittsburgh Penguins shakes hands with Matt Niskanen #2 of the Washington Capitals after the Penguins defeated the Capitals 4-3 in overtime in Game Six of the Eastern Conference Second Round during the 2016 NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs at Consol Energy Center on May 10, 2016 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  (Photo by Justin K. Aller/Getty Images)
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The mood is a “little sour” in the Washington Capitals locker room right now, and the discomfort goes deeper than losing back-to-back games for the first time in more than a year.

With it being early in 2016-17, maybe the Capitals aren’t totally over falling to the Pittsburgh Penguins after a resounding run to the Presidents’ Trophy.

“Last year, we were just so hungry all over the ice, and that’s why we had so much success. We just haven’t been as hungry right now,” Karl Alzner said, according to the Washington Post. “I don’t know if it’s because deep somewhere in our heads, we did that all season long and it still didn’t work for us, so maybe it’s just taking some time to build back up and as the season goes on, we get better. I don’t feel that in the front of my head, but maybe deep in the back, that’s kind of what’s going on. We’re better than how we’ve been playing.”

Credit Alzner for his candor, because that’s a remarkable admission of vulnerability.

Buying in

Not every member of the Capitals look at a few bumps in the road as a bad thing. Braden Holtby told the Washington Post that “a little bit of adversity never hurts to build a team,” and considering the rigors of an 82-game season, he’s likely correct.

As CSN Mid Atlantic notes, Barry Trotz understands the peaks and valleys of a lengthy campaign … but he still expects his players to buy-in.

“We’ve got the right elements to do what we can do. But there has to be a level of everybody [being] all in. You can’t be half in,” Trotz said. ” … You can’t let your foot off the gas in this league or you find yourself in a hole sometimes.”

Climbing that mountain once again

One can relate to the Capitals’ troubles in a way.

A negative type might feel a bit like Sisyphus here, wondering if it’s worth it to roll that boulder up a hill all over again after that playoff loss pushed them down. “We did that all season long and it still didn’t work for us,” as Alzner said.

Maybe the Capitals are over-thinking this a bit.

They have a few days off to ruminate on things, but the compressed three-game road trip coming up might be valuable in demanding all of their thoughts.

It’s tougher to find time for an existential crisis when you face three away contests in Western Canada during just four days. From the sound of things, it might be the perfect type of challenge for this group.