City of Glendale: Sale of Coyotes to Ice Edge Holdings in trouble

coyotes1.bmpThe never-ending soap opera in the desert concerning the sale of the Phoenix Coyotes continues to take awful turns for fans of hockey in Arizona. Rebekah Sanders of the Arizona Republic breaks news tonight that the City of Glendale, where the Coyotes currently reside at Jobing.com Arena, says that negotiations to sell the team to Ice Edge Holdings is in trouble.

A group seeking to buy the Phoenix Coyotes has not complied with terms that Glendale officials believe are required to pursue the purchase, city leaders confirm.

But Ice Edge Holdings and the National Hockey League say the deal is moving forward.

The dust-up is the latest in a series of negotiations between Glendale and at least two team bidders that have collapsed and resurfaced over a tortuous year for local hockey fans.

The group of Canadian and American investors was required to show Glendale proof of its financing last month in order to negotiate exclusively with the city and work on a detailed lease for the Coyotes to play at city-owned Jobing.com Arena.

At the deadline, Glendale said Ice Edge had submitted “some of the required financial information.” City officials declined public records requests for more detail.

But on Monday, city spokeswoman Julie Frisoni revealed that Ice Edge has failed to submit some of the required documents, five weeks past the deadline. She would not elaborate on the missing files.

Though the deadline for exclusivity is gone, Frisoni said, the city can still negotiate with Ice Edge.

But the clock is ticking. The tentative agreement between Glendale and Ice Edge aimed to conclude negotiations Aug. 6.

“We have a very tight timeline to make the deal,” Frisoni said.

While the deal that gave Ice Edge exclusivity in the rights to buy the team was hailed as a success, there’s been a lot of ill wind blowing around this situation all along. Think back to Jerry Reinsdorf being brought in at the NHL’s urging to help show that there was an interest by a proven owner to purchase the team. Reinsdorf was granted the same exclusivity that Ice Edge has but Reinsdorf got out of the mix to buy the team when Ice Edge stepped up.

When Ice Edge was granted the right of exclusivity, the NHL and the City of Glendale worked out an agreement to ensure that the team would stay there by ponying up $25 million if the NHL didn’t have a buyer for the team worked out by June 30th. Whoops, good bye money for the city, but hey they’ve still got a team and they’ve got a definitive future buyer in Ice Edge, right? Not so fast.

In all truth, this is just yet another apparent failing on behalf of all parties to sell this team. First it was Jerry Moyes trying to sneak out in the dark of night and hand the team over to Jim Balsillie and now it’s on the NHL to act as the kindly benefactor for the fans in Arizona and all that’s happened to this point, aside from a great season out of the Coyotes last year, is having the home town lose a ton of money and to have the future of the team staying in Glendale once again remain very much up in the air.

Ice Edge’s response to this news as well as the NHL’s likely “no comment” on the matter will follow this up soon. Ice Edge has been very honest and up front about everything all along as they’re the “people’s choice” for buying the team. Any kind of wavering in their words when discussing matters will be crushing for the fans in Glendale and Phoenix, and may once again spark hope in Winnipeg that they might soon get their team back. At the very least, there’s one guy that will be excited about that.

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    Video: Penguins coach takes issue with late, high Orpik hit on Maatta

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    The Pittsburgh Penguins have spoken out against a late, high hit that Washington Capitals defenseman Brooks Orpik threw on Olli Maatta early in the first period of an eventful Game 2 on Saturday.

    Maatta left and didn’t return. He played only 31 seconds, and the Penguins were reduced to five defensemen for a large portion of the game. Orpik was given a minor penalty on the play, but the league’s Department of Player Safety may see it differently.

    The hit occurred well after Maatta had gotten rid of the puck. He struggled on his way to the dressing room for further evaluation.

    Based on multiple reports, Orpik wasn’t made available to the media following the game, which went to the Penguins as they earned the split on the road.

    But the Penguins have taken issue with the hit.

    “I thought it was a late hit,” said Penguins coach Mike Sullivan, as per CSN Mid-Atlantic. “I thought it was a target to his head. I think it’s the type of hit everyone in hockey is trying to remove from the game.”

    Game on: Penguins even series with rival Capitals

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    The Pittsburgh Penguins will head back home with a split of their second-round series with the rival Washington Capitals.

    Former Capitals forward Eric Fehr came back to burn his hold team, as he scored with under five minutes remaining in regulation to help lift the Penguins over Washington with a 2-1 victory in an eventful Game 2 on Saturday. Evgeni Malkin threw the puck toward the net and Fehr was able to re-direct it by Braden Holtby.

    Oh, this was an eventful game, indeed.

    It started early in the first period with Capitals defenseman Brooks Orpik catching Penguins blue liner Olli Maatta with a late and high hit that warranted — at least for now — only a minor penalty for interference. Maatta, clearly in distress following the hit, didn’t play another shift and saw only 31 seconds of ice time in total, as Pittsburgh was reduced to five defensemen for the remainder of the game.

    It continued in the third period. Kris Letang was furious after getting called for a trip on Justin Williams, and even more ticked off when the Capitals tied the game on the ensuing power play.

    For two periods, the Capitals couldn’t get much going. Only four of their players had registered a shot on goal through 40 minutes, while the Penguins held the edge in that department and held the lead.

    Washington came out with more jump in the third period, testing rookie netminder Matt Murray with 14 shots in the final 20 minutes. But the Penguins got the late goal to break the deadlock.

    Video: Penguins’ Letang was furious after Capitals tie up Game 2 with power play goal

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    Kris Letang watched from the penalty box as the Washington Capitals tied up Game 2 with a power play goal in the third period. The Pittsburgh Penguins defenseman was called for tripping after he appeared to muscle Justin Williams off the puck as he entered the zone.

    Letang let his disagreement with the call be known at the time, and was furious after the Capitals capitalized on a goal from Marcus Johansson.

    The Capitals started the period down a goal and being outshot 28-10 by the Penguins, who need a win to even the series.

    Also, it seems this is worth mentioning:

    Video: Hagelin goes top shelf to give Penguins the lead in Game 2

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    In their quest to even the series, the Pittsburgh Penguins had done a nice job through two periods of suffocating the Washington Capitals, while gaining the lead on a beautiful goal.

    Carl Hagelin took advantage of a vast amount of space that opened up in front of the Washington net, finishing off a nice pass from Nick Bonino, burying his shot just under the cross bar on the glove side of Braden Holtby.

    Through two periods, the Penguins were outshooting Washington 28-10. Only four Capitals players — Alex Ovechkin, T.J. Oshie, Evgeny Kuznetsov and Matt Niskanen — had registered shots on goal.