City of Glendale: Sale of Coyotes to Ice Edge Holdings in trouble

coyotes1.bmpThe never-ending soap opera in the desert concerning the sale of the Phoenix Coyotes continues to take awful turns for fans of hockey in Arizona. Rebekah Sanders of the Arizona Republic breaks news tonight that the City of Glendale, where the Coyotes currently reside at Jobing.com Arena, says that negotiations to sell the team to Ice Edge Holdings is in trouble.

A group seeking to buy the Phoenix Coyotes has not complied with terms that Glendale officials believe are required to pursue the purchase, city leaders confirm.

But Ice Edge Holdings and the National Hockey League say the deal is moving forward.

The dust-up is the latest in a series of negotiations between Glendale and at least two team bidders that have collapsed and resurfaced over a tortuous year for local hockey fans.

The group of Canadian and American investors was required to show Glendale proof of its financing last month in order to negotiate exclusively with the city and work on a detailed lease for the Coyotes to play at city-owned Jobing.com Arena.

At the deadline, Glendale said Ice Edge had submitted “some of the required financial information.” City officials declined public records requests for more detail.

But on Monday, city spokeswoman Julie Frisoni revealed that Ice Edge has failed to submit some of the required documents, five weeks past the deadline. She would not elaborate on the missing files.

Though the deadline for exclusivity is gone, Frisoni said, the city can still negotiate with Ice Edge.

But the clock is ticking. The tentative agreement between Glendale and Ice Edge aimed to conclude negotiations Aug. 6.

“We have a very tight timeline to make the deal,” Frisoni said.

While the deal that gave Ice Edge exclusivity in the rights to buy the team was hailed as a success, there’s been a lot of ill wind blowing around this situation all along. Think back to Jerry Reinsdorf being brought in at the NHL’s urging to help show that there was an interest by a proven owner to purchase the team. Reinsdorf was granted the same exclusivity that Ice Edge has but Reinsdorf got out of the mix to buy the team when Ice Edge stepped up.

When Ice Edge was granted the right of exclusivity, the NHL and the City of Glendale worked out an agreement to ensure that the team would stay there by ponying up $25 million if the NHL didn’t have a buyer for the team worked out by June 30th. Whoops, good bye money for the city, but hey they’ve still got a team and they’ve got a definitive future buyer in Ice Edge, right? Not so fast.

In all truth, this is just yet another apparent failing on behalf of all parties to sell this team. First it was Jerry Moyes trying to sneak out in the dark of night and hand the team over to Jim Balsillie and now it’s on the NHL to act as the kindly benefactor for the fans in Arizona and all that’s happened to this point, aside from a great season out of the Coyotes last year, is having the home town lose a ton of money and to have the future of the team staying in Glendale once again remain very much up in the air.

Ice Edge’s response to this news as well as the NHL’s likely “no comment” on the matter will follow this up soon. Ice Edge has been very honest and up front about everything all along as they’re the “people’s choice” for buying the team. Any kind of wavering in their words when discussing matters will be crushing for the fans in Glendale and Phoenix, and may once again spark hope in Winnipeg that they might soon get their team back. At the very least, there’s one guy that will be excited about that.

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    Report: Marleau won’t face supplemental discipline for hit on Rust

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    It sounds like Patrick Marleau won’t be suspended for his hit on Penguins forward Bryan Rust (top) in Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final on Monday night, according to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

    After the game, Marleau told reporters that he was pretty confident he wouldn’t be suspended and it sounds like he’s right.

    Penguins head coach Mike Sullivan didn’t see things the same way.

    “It’s a blindside hit to the head,” he said. “[Marleau] gets a penalty and I’m sure the league will look at it.”

    Marleau was given a two-minute penalty for an illegal hit to the head on the play.

    Rust played a single shift after taking the hit, but he went to the locker room after that and didn’t return. Sullivan said he’s day-to-day. It’s unclear if Rust will practice with the team on Tuesday.

    Former Flyer Rick MacLeish passes away at age 66

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    Former Philadelphia Flyers forward Rick MacLeish passed away on Monday night. He was 66-years-old. The organization confirmed the news early Tuesday morning. MacLeish was battling meningitis as well as kidney and liver problems, per Philly.com.

    “With the passing of Rick MacLeish, the Flyers have lost one of their legends,” Flyers President Paul Holmgren said in a release. “A good father, grandfather, teammate and friend, Rick will be missed by all who were fortunate to come and know him over the years. His happy and friendly demeanor was front and center everywhere Rick went. Today, our thoughts and prayers are with Rick’s wife, Charlene, his daughters, Danielle and Brianna along with his grandchildren. May he rest in peace.”

    MacLeish first put on a Flyers jersey during the 1970-71 season. He would go on to score 349 goals and 759 points in 846 NHL games with Philadelphia, Hartford, Pittsburgh and Detroit. MacLeish also scored what is considered to be the most important goal in Flyers history when he netted the opening goal in Game 6 of the 1974 Stanley Cup Final against Boston. The Flyers would clinch their first Stanley Cup that night.

    He won a pair of Stanley Cups with the Flyers and was named an NHL All-Star three times in his career.

    PHT Morning Skate: Nick Bonino has been pretty clutch this postseason

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    PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

    Pascal Dupuis wrote a piece for The Players’ Tribune.

    Matt Cullen also wrote a piece for The Players’ Tribune called “Hockey Dad”.

    Dainius Zubrus is making his third trip to the cup final, but he still hasn’t won one. (Puck Daddy)

    –Watch the highlights from Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final. (Top)

    –Here’s the Punjabi call of Nick Bonino‘s game-winning goal. (Streamable)

    –Speaking of Bonino, he’s been pretty clutch this postseason:

    –The NHL still wants to play an outdoor game on Parliament Hill in Ottawa. (Ottawa Sun)

    On his third team in three years, Bonino has ‘found a home for sure’ in Pittsburgh

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    PITTSBURGH — In Anaheim, Nick Bonino was good, but not quite good enough to be the Ducks’ second-line center. So two summers ago he was traded to Vancouver as part of a package for Ryan Kesler.

    In Vancouver, Bonino had one decent enough season, but the Canucks ultimately decided he wasn’t the kind of “foundation piece” they were looking for. So last summer he was traded to Pittsburgh as part of a package for Brandon Sutter.

    In Pittsburgh though?

    In Pittsburgh, Nick Bonino is a playoff hero, verging on folk hero. The 28-year-old scored the winning goal in the final minutes of Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final. The chemistry he’s developed with linemates Phil Kessel and Carl Hagelin has helped take the pressure off Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin. It’s given the Penguins what they’ve needed for so many years.

    “He’s had some huge goals in the playoffs, come up really big,” said teammate Matt Cullen. “Obviously playing in the middle of that line, he’s been huge for us all playoffs. It just brings another element of depth to our team.”

    And if you think Cullen had nice things to say about Bonino, that was nothing compared to head coach Mike Sullivan.

    “I think he’s a terrific player in every aspect of the game,” said Sullivan. “We use him in so many key situations, both offensively and defensively. I think he’s a guy that has a real high hockey IQ, sees the ice really well. He has real good hands. His awareness defensively I think, the use of his stick to take passing lanes away, it’s impressive.

    “He’s brave. He blocks shots. He’s one of our better shot-blockers. He’s a good faceoff guy. He’s done so much for this team to help us get to this point. I don’t know what other praise I can shower on him right now. We think he’s a terrific player.”

    Signed through next season, after which he can become an unrestricted free agent, Bonino was asked if he’s finally found a long-term home in Pittsburgh.

    “I don’t know about long-term, you never know. Especially me, the last few summers,” he said.

    “[But] I think I found a home for sure. I enjoy the guys, enjoy the team. Organization is first class. Definitely feels nice to be in the Cup final playing with these two guys. It’s been a lot of fun for me.”