Beware of the fan poll: How each NHL team received its name

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redwingslogo.gifI’m a sucker for origin stories. While it’s fairly certain that the world doesn’t need to know why Batman fights crime anymore, I find that one of the most interesting questions to ask is “How did we get here?” So it’s no surprise that I was delighted to read this story from the Palm Beach Post that covers how each team in the NHL stumbled upon their names.

(There seems to be two central themes to the team naming process: 1) it’s dangerous to allow quirky owners to create team names, even if it occasionally results in something iconic and 2) giving fans the right to name the team can result in some wacky mascots.)

Anyway, here are a few of the most interesting entries, with a sporadic comment or two inserted here and there.

Buffalo Sabres

The team was founded in 1970. Owners had an interest in polo and were fascinated with cavalry, knight and chivalry themes.

See: theme No. 1 above. For some reason that reasoning made me giggle.

Detroit Red Wings

Founded in 1926 as the Detroit Cougars, the team was renamed Falcons in 1930. In 1932, the new owner, who had once played for Winged Wheelers of Montreal Amateur Athletic Association, renamed team “Red Wings” and adopted winged wheel logo.

I’m still not sure that actually makes sense, but a strange preference by an owner (again, see theme No. 1) resulted in one of the greatest logos in all of team sports.

Minnesota Wild

The North Stars, who were founded in 1967, moved to Dallas in 1993. When a new franchise awarded to Minnesota in 1997, “Wild” was picked in a name-the-team contest. The team said the name honored Minnesota’s rugged natural wilderness. Other finalists: Blue Ox, Freeze, Northern Lights, Voyageurs, White Bears.

Does anyone else find it astonishing that the Wild was actually the best choice of the finalists, at least if you consider the fact that the Northern Lights would be too close to the North Stars? It doesn’t change the fact that the Wild is an inexplicable attack on grammar and good mascot sense, though.

Montreal Canadiens

When the National Hockey Association was founded in 1909, Montreal already had a team comprised of English-speaking players called the Montreal Wanderers. A group then founded a team of French-speaking players and called it “Les Canadiens,” French for Canadian. The NHA became NHL in 1917. “CH” on front of Canadiens uniform is French for “Club de Hockey Canadien.” In 1920s, New York Rangers owner Tex Rickard had picked up on a rumor that the “H” was for “habitants,” a French slang term for a Quebec farmer. The nickname stuck and was later shortened to “Habs.”

It never hurts to include an explanation of why people call the Canadiens the “Habs.”

New Jersey Devils

When the Colorado Rockies moved to New Jersey in 1982, newspapers held a naming contest that led to Devils. The legend of “New Jersey Devil” dates back 250 years. It says a woman in southern New Jersey who dabbled in witchcraft gave birth to a 13th child, a demonic creature that was part man, bat, snake and kangaroo. Creature supposedly continues to torment region.

Apparently the New Jersey Devil creates smog, nasally accents and cranky citizens. Still, I might pay money to see a creature that is “part man, bat, snake and kangaroo.”

Tampa Bay Lightning

Shortly before the franchise was awarded in 1990, team management was meeting during a thunderstorm and saw bolt of lightning, inspiring name.

That’s a pretty neat little story, right there.

So those were my favorite of the bunch, but if you want to learn more about why your favorite, most hated or any other NHL team got its name click here. It’s fascinating stuff.

(H/T to Kukla’s Korner.)

Video: Rangers shut out red-hot Sidney Crosby and the Penguins

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The New York Rangers are likely too far behind the Washington Capitals to take any legitimate run at the Atlantic Division down the stretch.

But winners now of four straight, the Rangers have opened up a bit of a gap between them and other Eastern Conference teams in the playoff race. New York scored a 3-0 win over the Pittsburgh Penguins, winners in six of their last seven games, on Wednesday.

In the process, they held a red-hot Sidney Crosby off the score sheet, which has been a difficult, sometimes impossible task for opposing teams since about the middle of December. He entered this game with a seven-game scoring streak.

(In fact, New York held No. 87 to without a shot on goal in the entire game.)

Henrik Lundqvist stopped all 34 shots he faced for the shutout.

Kevin Hayes gave the Rangers the lead in the first period, before Dominic Moore and Jesper Fast put the game away in the third.

Pittsburgh remains in the second Wild Card spot in the East. The Rangers now move three points clear of the rival Islanders for second in the Metropolitan.

Video: Wideman hearing ‘a tricky case’ as NHLPA hopes to get 20-game suspension reduced

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There is no certain timeline for when NHL commissioner Gary Bettman might rule on Dennis Wideman‘s appeal, according to a report from hockey insider Darren Dreger on NBCSN, as the Calgary Flames defenseman hopes to get his 20-game ban for hitting linesman Don Henderson reduced.

“Now, ultimately what they’re hoping from a Wideman perspective and the Players’ Association is that commissioner Gary Bettman will rule and he will reduce the number of games suspended down from 20,” said Dreger during a segment on NBCSN.

“Is he going to reduce it by three games? Five games seems a bit of a stretch. And when might he do that? There’s no timeline on this.”

Report: Coyotes shut down Vitale (concussion) for the season

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Joe Vitale will not play again this season.

The Arizona Coyotes have shut Vitale down for the remainder of the 2015-16 campaign due to “concussion-related issues,” according to a report from Sarah McLellan of azcentral sports on Wednesday.

Vitale, a 30-year-old veteran center, appeared in only one game for the Coyotes this season. That was back on Oct. 17, when he suffered a concussion and broken orbital bone in a fight with Kevan Miller of the Boston Bruins.

Sens announce Frattin, acquired in Phaneuf deal, will stick with AHL Marlies

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Matt Frattin was traded by the Leafs to Ottawa yesterday as part of the Dion Phaneuf blockbuster.

But for now, he’s staying in Toronto.

On Wednesday, Sens GM Bryan Murray announced that Frattin will remain with the Leafs’ AHL affiliate — the Toronto Marlies — on loan, but will be available for selection should Ottawa require his services down the road.

Frattin, 28, has spent all of this season with the Marlies, scoring nine goals and 22 points in 47 games. His last NHL appearance came during the ’14-15 campaign, with the Leafs.

Prior to that, the former North Dakota standout had spent time in Los Angeles and Columbus.