Atlanta Thrashers fans gladly pass on Kovalchuk 'drama'

ilyawnasathrasher.jpgAt the 18 day mark, we may just run out of thesaurus entries for the word “exhausting” when describing the Ilya Kovalchuk saga. Dare someone use the headline “Ilyawn” at this point? The give-and-take between the Russian winger and the Los Angeles Kings/New Jersey Devils has been drawn out beyond well-worn boundaries, not unlike the excessive buildup between two attractive co-eds in a typical sitcom. “Just get it over with, already,” we said a week ago. At least.

There’s at least one group of people who might only find this amusing: Atlanta Thrashers fans. One happens to write a column/blog for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, and he expresses relief in not having to follow “As the Kovalchuk Turns” this time around.

So if there is to be a repeat of that holdout drama, then Kovy-Watch ’10 as only just begun.

About the only thing that seems to be certain regarding Ilya’s summer adventure this time is that he’s not going to get the same coin as the Thrashers offered up to him last winter. $10 million for 3 to 7 years or somewhere in the neighborhood of $100 mil for 12 years is now surely out of the question for Kovy.

So just where will Kovalchuk eventual wind up…and when will he wind up there? shrugs…I dunno. But all I can say is that I’m glad happy thrilledecstatic that Thrasherville is not the site of this particular saga.

In fact, I’m sorta looking forward this coming season in which the Thrashers aren’t having to deal with such distractions. You know, distractions such as whether or not superstars like Marian Hossa or Ilya Kovalchuk will re-sign…or if Kari Lehtonen’s back/groin/[insert issue here] will keep him out of the lineup for an extended period of time.

Quite frankly…Thrasherville can do without the drama.

(Not really sure why he employed the “strike-through” gimmick there, but to each his own, I guess.)

Rather than counting on mercurial talents, the Thrashers are shifting their focus to building a team that is about as subtle as a kick to the junk. It’s unclear if such a departure will actually result in an increase in victories, but at least Atlanta won’t be a glorified vacation for opposing teams any longer. A team once embodied by its departed Russian captain is already looking drastically different just six-or-so-months later.

We’ll see if Thrashers fans should like what they see starting in October.

Scroll Down For:

    Avs unveil new third jerseys

    Avs Jerseys
    Leave a comment

    The Avalanche will be throwing a bunch of different looks at us this season.

    Having already released specialized “Mile High” jerseys for February’s Stadium Series game, the Avs unveiled new third sweaters on Friday — less than 24 hours after a bitter 5-4 home loss to Minnesota in their season opener.

    (Guess Colorado wanted to send out some good vibes after blowing a 4-1 third-period lead.)

    These new thirds won’t come as a huge shock, however. Last month, several websites published leaked images of Colorado’s and Anaheim’s third jerseys, so the design has been in the public eye for several weeks.

    Colorado will debut its new thirds on Oct. 24, in a Saturday night tilt against Columbus.

    Related: Roy explains why he didn’t call time out

    Report: Escrow set at 16 percent

    Gary Bettman, Donald Fehr
    1 Comment

    Hey, remember in June when the NHLPA voted to keep the five-percent growth factor in spite of increasing worries about escrow?

    Well, here’s why that decision was a significant one, via TSN’s Frank Seravalli:

    With early revenue projections in place, the NHL and NHLPA set the escrow withholding rate for players at 16 per cent for the first quarter of the season on Thursday.

    That means every player will have 16 per cent of earnings deducted from their paycheque and put aside until after all of this season’s hockey-related revenue is counted to ensure a perfect 50-50 revenue split with owners.

    Now, this doesn’t mean that the players will definitely lose 16 percent of their salaries. Typically, they receive refunds when all the accounting is done.

    Still, 16 percent is a good-sized chunk to withhold. They won’t be thrilled about it.

    Related: To understand escrow, consider Duncan Keith