Tampa Bay's new regime wants to remember the past, particularly the '04 Cup

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lecupalier.jpgWhen you look at the list of the last 10-or-so Stanley Cup champions, there are two teams who stick out for the wrong reasons: the Carolina Hurricanes and Tampa Bay Lightning. Pardon the pun, but the two squads seemed like they just caught lightning in a bottle for a summer when they won their championships. Such flippant commentary is given a dab of credibility when you consider how fleeting their post-Cup successes have been, especially for the cellar dwelling Lightning.

That being said, it’s clear that change is circulating through the moribund franchise. Obviously, adding one of the great captains of the 90s in Steve Yzerman to your front office doesn’t hurt, but much-ballyhooed AHL coach Guy Boucher might be putting his sports psychology degree to use already as their new bench boss.

Damian Cristodero of the St. Peterbsurg Times reports that while the past regime seemed to disavow all memories of the 2004 Stanley Cup, the new group plans on adorning the locker room with mementos from the team’s run. (When you consider that two of the biggest pieces from that run – Vincent Lecavalier and Martin St. Louis – still skate for the Lightning, it makes a lot of sense).

That is the plan, said coach Guy Boucher, who wants those images where players can see them; a design makeover for those common areas he made sound like a history lesson, a tutorial and even a symbolic papering over of a culture of losing.

The pictures have yet to be selected, but they will feature Lightning players mobbing each other while celebrating the Cup victory. If Boucher’s history is any indication, expect companion photos of players blocking shots and throwing checks.

“It’s making sure the players that are new know that this organization has had success in the past, and we can tap into that experience,” Boucher said. “I’ve always done that, gathered positive things to look at and look up to and strive for.”

Mathieu Darche, a former Lightning player who last season played for Boucher at AHL Hamilton, said it sounds exactly like what the 2007 Calder Cup champions had in their locker room.

“As soon as you walked in the dressing room, there were all different pictures kind of mixed up together,” Darche said. “Guys winning the Cup, guys scoring goals, a couple of guys fighting, guys diving to block the puck. It’s a reminder of what you have to do. I liked it.”

Of course, the glass-half-empty crowd will say that putting up photos of old glory is akin to living in the past.

No doubt about it, it’s up to this new group to write the next chapters for the still-young franchise. While Lecavalier and St. Louis are holdovers, the future will depend just as much on relative newcomers such as Steven Stamkos, Victor Hedman and Dan Ellis. The team is starting to build something interesting there, but it never hurts to remember what helped them win in the first place.

Bernier (upper-body injury) gives way to Gibson in Ducks net

GLENDALE, AZ - OCTOBER 01:  Goaltender Jonathan Bernier #1 of the Anaheim Ducks during the preseason NHL game against Arizona Coyotes at Gila River Arena on October 1, 2016 in Glendale, Arizona. The Coyotes defeated the Ducks 3-2 in overtime.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
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Anaheim Ducks goalie John Gibson began Tuesday’s game on the bench, but was forced into action to begin the second period against the San Jose Sharks.

Jonathan Bernier, who got the start, left the game with an upper-body injury and was doubtful to return, the Ducks stated on Twitter.

Bernier has played in only one other game for Anaheim so far, making 42 saves on 45 shots in a loss to the Pittsburgh Penguins on Oct. 15.

‘Dig in there with the rest of the guys,’ says Babcock after leaving Andersen in against Bolts

OTTAWA, ON - OCTOBER 12: In his first game as a member of the Toronto Maple Leafs Frederik Andersen #31 puts his mask on against the Ottawa Senators at Canadian Tire Centre on October 12, 2016 in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.  (Photo by Jana Chytilova/Freestyle Photography/Getty Images)
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Frederik Andersen‘s difficult start to the season continues.

After an interesting exchange when questioned about his goaltender prior to Tuesday’s game against the visiting Tampa Bay Lightning and some guy named Steven Stamkos, Toronto Maple Leafs coach Mike Babcock was once again forced to answer inquiries about the play of Andersen, who allowed seven goals on just 24 shots.

Andersen stayed in the crease for the entire game, as the Leafs lost 7-3. He certainly didn’t get much help in the defensive end from his teammates in front of him.

Stamkos started the scoring for Tampa Bay, and continued it with a rocket one-timer past Andersen, before finishing with a four-point night.

But in Toronto, the conversation about the amazing play of rookies like Auston Matthews and Mitch Marner seems to have shifted to the play of their goalie, acquired in a blockbuster deal with Anaheim, in which Toronto parted ways with a first- and second-round pick to make it happen. The Leafs then signed him to a five-year, $25 million deal.

Playing on a new team in a hockey-crazed market has likely been an adjustment. His season also started with an injury in Olympic qualifying.

Following the loss Tuesday, Babcock explained his reasoning for leaving Andersen in net for all seven Tampa Bay goals, two of which came late in the third period.

“I want him to play. He’s my guy. I want him to play,” said Babcock, as per Jonas Siegel of The Canadian Press. “So I could pull him and then say, ‘Okay I showed you!’ But what did I show him? To me, dig in there with the rest of the guys, make the next save and give us a chance to come back and win the game. You can’t do that sitting on the bench.”

The Maple Leafs face the Florida Panthers on Thursday. Florida’s goalie Roberto Luongo knows all-too-well about the pressures that come with playing the position in a Canadian market.

It is early in Andersen’s Toronto tenure.

But Babcock will likely be facing a similar line of questioning until his goalie turns it around.

Video: Flyers complete the comeback, defeat Sabres in the shootout

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The rookie got it started. The stars finished it.

The Philadelphia Flyers looked like they were headed for a second straight loss, down three goals to the Buffalo Sabres on home ice entering the third period of Tuesday’s game.

Matt Moulson had a pair of goals for Buffalo, both on the power play. He capitalized six seconds after Claude Giroux was called for hitting Zemgus Girgensons from behind the into the boards.

But the Flyers, who played Monday in Montreal, came roaring back in the third period.

Travis Konecny began the comeback, scoring his first career NHL goal. He had five assists coming into this game, but finally buried his first goal on a nifty deflection in front. The milestone moment got the Flyers on the board.

Late third-period power play goals from Brayden Schenn and Mark Streit just 1:05 apart sent this game to overtime, as Philly was able to capitalize on a pair of late Buffalo penalties.

Giroux and Jakub Voracek scored in the shootout to complete the comeback and give Philadelphia a 4-3 victory.

Meanwhile, the Sabres, without Jack Eichel and Evander Kane, are still searching for their second win of the season.

Crosby returns, and so does Penguins’ balanced attack in win

TORONTO, ON - NOVEMBER 14: Sidney Crosby #87 and Evgeni Malkin #71 of the Pittsburgh Penguins skate against the Toronto Maple Leafs at the Air Canada Centre on November 14, 2014 in Toronto, Canada.  (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)
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PITTSBURGH — With Sidney Crosby back in the lineup for the first time this season on Tuesday night the Pittsburgh Penguins roster is starting to resemble the one that lifted the Stanley Cup four months ago.

About half way through their 3-2 win over the Florida Panthers, they finally started to look like that team on the ice, too.

Entering the game having lost three out of four (while looking quite bad and being outscored 15-7 in the process) it looked like that early season slump was going to continue on Tuesday when they faced a 2-0 deficit midway through the second period.

They looked sluggish. They couldn’t stay out of the penalty box. The Panthers were completely shutting the game down and had just put on a penalty killing clinic where they played a 40-second game of keep-away, sparking a chorus of boos from the home crowd.

And then Sidney Crosby showed up.

It was at that point that Crosby found himself wide open in the middle of the ice to accept a pass from Evgeni Malkin and rip it past Panthers goalie Jamies Reimer for his first goal of the year.

In the end, it was a typical night at the office for Crosby.

He scored a goal, was a possession-driving machine (better than 63 percent of the shot attempts with Crosby on the ice belonged to Pittsburgh) and finished with a team-leading four shots on goal and seven attempts.

But for his good as he was in his 2016-17 debut, the biggest impact his return had is it made once again made their lineup a nightmare to match up against.

The Penguins’ calling card in last year’s playoffs was their ability to play fast, and their deep, balanced attack that had four lines that could all contribute. It was a matchup problem that nobody could really handle as they kept rotating lines with Crosby, Evgeni Malkin and Phil Kessel out one after another (not to mention a fourth line that has some scoring potential as well).

They obviously lose a lot of that advantage when Crosby is out of the lineup and teams only really have two big-time scoring threats to worry about.

On Tuesday, you could see it eventually start to become an issue for the Panthers as the Penguins received goals from three different lines in the win.

After Crosby scored to get the Penguins on the board, Carl Hagelin scored his first of the season to tie the game five minutes into the third period. Then fourth line provided the winner four minutes later when Eric Fehr finished a perfect pass from Tom Kuhnhackl.

Even with the win on Tuesday and a 4-2-1 start to the season it is still pretty clear the Penguins have some things to work through and are not quite where they need to be at this point. They have to cut down on the penalties. They really haven’t played a complete 60-minute game yet. The HBK line (which was broken up in the third period against Florida) has not really clicked the way it did in the playoffs. Kris Letang is still injured. But on Tuesday you started to see flashes of what made the team such a force in the playoffs.

With Crosby back on the ice and extending the lineup, you might start to see it happen a little more often.