Duncan Keith's day with the Stanley Cup

keithscaryteeth.jpgDuncan Keith might be the only Chicago Blackhawk whose 2009-10 campaign was as eventful as that of Patrick Kane and Jonathan Toews. In one hockey year, Keith shined on a gold medal winning Canadian Olympic team, lost a bunch of teeth in the playoffs, earned his first career Norris Trophy and (of course) a Stanley Cup.

Not bad for a kid whose pro hockey dreams once earned mocking laughter. NHL.com has the story of Keith’s day with the Cup in Penticton, B.C.

Jean Keith will never forget the day when she realized her hockey-crazed son, Duncan, was fixated on proving the skeptics wrong.

“One parent asked Duncan, ‘What do you want to be when you grow up?’ and he said ‘I want to be an NHL player,’ ” Jean told NHL.com on Saturday. “And the parent just laughed because Duncan was just so small. But he was really mad that she laughed and he asked me, ‘Why is she laughing, mom?’

“He was 9 years old at the time, and I knew then his heart was in this for the long haul.”

Keith received the typical hero’s welcome with the Cup, although the smooth-skating defenseman put his own little touches on the usual ceremonies. He had a local bagpipe band play his entrance music as he was greeted by 5,100 fans and community members itching to congratulate Keith and spend a moment with the Cup. The mayor gave made July 17 Duncan Keith day and handed the young player a key to the city.

Most importantly, though, Keith donated $10,000 to a local charity.

Keith made a $10,000 donation to the Penticton District Regional Hospital and also presented an autographed Team Canada jersey to Penticton mayor Dan Ashton. In turn, Ashton not only proclaimed July 17 as “Duncan Keith Day,” but even presented the hometown hero with a key to the city.

“I think as hockey players we make a pretty good living and we all do something we love, and whatever they want to do with that check is fine by me as long as it’s going to help the hospital out and help people,” Keith said. “Hopefully, it’ll make someone’s life better.”

While the team struggles with salary cap concerns, my bet is that Keith will still be a bargain even though his $5.54 million cap hit will last for a staggering 13 seasons. (He should at least live up to that deal for, oh, eight years or so. My guess is he’ll earn every cent each season, though.)

I was going to post NHL.com’s video of his journey, but honestly, it’s tremendously boring. If you’re dying to see it, though, click here.

PHT Morning Skate: Remembering 10 years of Crosby, Ovechkin

Sidney Crosby, Alex Ovechkin
AP Photo
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PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

Here’s a detailed look back at Sidney Crosby and Alex Ovechkin‘s first 10 years in the NHL. (NHL.com)

Speaking of Crosby, he’s signed a multiyear partnership with adidas. (Newswire)

Ryan Nugent-Hopkins will play a key role in easing Connor McDavid into the NHL. (Edmonton Sun)

After two polar opposite seasons, the jury is still out on Patrick Roy as a head coach. (Denver Post)

Marc-Andre Fleury enjoys pulling off pranks on his teammates. “I play better when I’m looser, laughing and having fun,” he said. (Pittsburgh Tribune-Review)

Art McDonald, a Canadian who won recently won a Nobel Prize, talked to the committee members about the Toronto Maple Leafs. (SB Nation)

DiMaio named Blues’ director of player personnel

via St. Louis Blues
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The St. Louis Blues named Rob DiMaio their director of player personnel on Tuesday.

He’s been with the organization for some time. He joined as a pro scout in 2008 and was the pro scouting director starting in August 2012.

He was also a scout for the Dallas Stars before landing with the Blues (one would assume his biggest connection is GM Doug Armstrong, then).

In case his nose didn’t give it away, he also enjoyed a lengthy hockey career over 19 seasons.

No doubt about it, this is a pivotal season for the Blues after multiple campaigns in which strong regular seasons dissolved into playoff disappointments. Perhaps DiMaio can make a difference in a heightened role?