Looking back at the most scandalous offer sheet dramas in NHL history

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kevinlowe.jpgI’ve stated this quite a bit the last few days, but it’s surprising NHL teams are so reluctant to send promising players offer sheets. I imagine there’s a lot of “Golden Rule” justification for staying away (“What if I’m in their shoes?,” general managers would shout), but … wouldn’t Bobby Ryan be worth a few bitter glances at the country club?

While the Sharks bidding for Niklas Hjalmarsson seems more like an exception to the rule, hockey does have an interesting history of offer sheets during the last 20 years or so. John Grigg presented his top 10 all-time offer sheet scandals today. Here’s the top three.

3. Scott Stevens, 1990
No one in league history has been as much of a poacher as former St. Louis GM Ron Caron. In 1990 he rolled the dice and made Washington’s Stevens the highest-paid blueliner in the NHL with a four-year, $5.1-million contract offer. An arbiter awarded the Capitals five first round draft picks, putting the Blues’ future pipeline into question.

2. Sergei Fedorov, 1998
The feud between Carolina owner Peter Karmanos and Detroit owner Mike Illitch is a famous one. And it was never more heated than when Karmanos attempted to lure Fedorov to the Hurricanes with a mammoth six-year, $38-million contract that could have paid the Russian up to $28 million with bonuses the first year (one of the clauses was based on the team making the semifinal, something the Canes were far less likely than Detroit to do). The Wings matched and the war continued.

1. Brendan Shanahan, 1991
A year after landing Stevens, Caron went after New Jersey’s burgeoning star winger Shanahan, trying to get him in a Blues uniform. He got his man when the Devils refused to match the offer, but the controversy didn’t end there. The teams went to arbitration, with the Blues offering Curtis Joseph, Rod Brind’Amour and two draft picks as compensation. But the arbiter leaned Jersey’s way and awarded the Devils – dah, de-da, dah – Scott Stevens… meaning the total cost to St. Louis for signing Shanny was five first round picks and Stevens. Ouch.

One name that showed up a lot on this list was Hall of Famer Scott Stevens. His contract situations factored into the top 10 twice (No. 10 in 1994 and No. 3 in 1990) and also were involved in Brendan Shanahan’s scenario, too.

Perhaps former St. Louis Blues GM Ron Caron was preaching my offer sheet gospel in the ’90s as he was clearly very aggressive in that department. (Then again, maybe all those burnt bridges explain why you don’t hear much about “The Old Professor”” anymore.)

The biggest, most recent year for crazy offer sheet situations was 2007. That was the year that Kevin Lowe angered Brian Burke by signing Dustin Penner to a hefty offer sheet while Lowe also forced the Buffalo Sabres to match his ridiculous five year, $50 million offer sheet for sniper Thomas Vanek. (The Sabres had little choice as their fans were already reeling from the loss of Chris Drury and Danny Briere … which, looking at the contracts of those players, actually turned out to be a good thing for money-challenged Buffalo.)

So, yes, it’s not the most socially acceptable thing to do, but offer sheet drama is very interesting when it does happen. Oh, and sometimes it can swing the very flow of the sport. (See: Stevens, Scott.)

Lindholm in Sweden, won’t report to Ducks until contract signed

Hampus Lindholm
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Yesterday, we passed along news of Hampus Lindholm‘s contract demands — reportedly eight years, at least $6 million per — and news that the prized young d-man has been training in Sweden.

Now, his agent has confirmed Lindholm won’t be leaving Sweden until the deal gets done.

“Our plan is to report to the team once we have a contract signed,” said Claude Lemieux, per the O.C. Register. “Until then Hampus is training in Sweden.”

The 22-year-old is currently skating with SHL club Rogle BK, the same team Lindholm played for prior to getting drafted sixth overall in 2012.

The Ducks are already two games into their preseason schedule, and will play their third on Saturday in Arizona. From there, Anaheim has four exhibition games remaining — against the Kings, Oilers and two against the Sharks — before opening the regular season on Oct. 13 in Dallas.

Lemieux confirmed to the Register that they’re working on a “long-term agreement” for Lindholm, adding that both he and Ducks GM Bob Murray are “working on getting this resolved ASAP.”

The Ducks certainly need Lindholm in the lineup. He led all blueliners in goals last year, with 10, and averaged 22 minutes per night, second only to Cam Fowler on defense.

Penguins to visit White House next week

SAN JOSE, CA - JUNE 12: The Pittsburgh Penguins pose for their photo with the Stanley Cup after their teams 3-1 victory to win the Stanley Cup against the San Jose Sharks in Game Six of the 2016 NHL Stanley Cup Final at SAP Center on June 12, 2016 in San Jose, California. The Pittsburgh Penguins defeat the San Jose Sharks 3-1. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
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The Stanley Cup champion Pittsburgh Penguins will visit President Obama at the White House on Thursday (Oct. 6).

These White House visits don’t always occur during the preseason (the 2015 champs from Chicago went in February, for example), but as you might have heard, there’s an election in November.

This will be the Penguins’ second visit with President Obama. They first met him after winning in 2009, during his first term. That visit actually occurred in early September, before the Pens even reported to training camp.

“With the Steelers and Penguins, I guess it’s a good time to be a sports fan in Pittsburgh,” Obama said during the visit.

“I was complaining about this,” he then joked. “It’s been a while since Chicago won anything.”

The next year, the Blackhawks won their first Cup since 1961.

Hossa going ‘year-by-year,’ as his contract begins to dive

CHICAGO, IL - FEBRUARY 09:  Marian Hossa #81 of the Chicago Blackhawks talks to a teammate against the San Jose Sharks at the United Center on February 9, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois. The Sharks defeated the Blackhawks 2-0.  (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
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Marian Hossa has one of those long-term, back-diving contracts they don’t let players sign anymore.

When he signed the 12-year deal, all the way back in 2009, it was generally assumed he’d retired before it expired. (Remember, the NHL didn’t have the “cap recapture” penalty then; that was brought in a few years later.)

This season, his salary dips to $4 million, from the $7.9 million he was paid in the first seven years of his deal. After that, it’s just $1 million in each of the final four years, per General Fanager.

So, does the assumption that he’ll retire before his contract expires still hold?

“I go year-by-year right now and I try to not focus on five years,” Hossa said, per the Chicago Tribune. “At this point, you never know what can happen. You know, too many injuries or these things can slow you down. Or anything can change. But right now I feel pretty good so I try to go for it.”

Hossa can still play, make no mistake. His point production fell dramatically last season, and it remains to be seen if he’ll skate with Jonathan Toews in Chicago’s top six, or if he’ll be knocked down to the third line. But anyone who watched him during the World Cup knows he can still play.

That being said, at 37, he’s one of the oldest players in the NHL. In fact, last season, there were only 10 forwards who were older, and that list will only grow shorter this season.

So, will Hossa play five more years, until he’s 42? It will be incredible if he does. And if he doesn’t, will the Blackhawks incur a recapture penalty? Or will some sort of injury allow them to escape it?

That all remains to be seen.

“My goal is to play to where I can play my level,” he said, “and if not, go from there.”

Related: Quenneville thinks Hossa ‘could be’ the next Jagr or Selanne

Landeskog to remain captain under Bednar, his third head coach in Colorado

DENVER, CO - FEBRUARY 17:  Gabriel Landeskog #92 of the Colorado Avalanche looks on during a break in the action against the Montreal Canadiens at Pepsi Center on February 17, 2016 in Denver, Colorado. The Avalanche defeated the Canadiens 3-2.  (Photo by Doug Pensinger/Getty Images)
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Per the Denver Post, new Colorado head coach Jared Bednar has informed Gabriel Landeskog he will remain Avs captain this season.

It’s a speech Landeskog has heard before.

Originally named captain back in 2012 under then-head coach Joe Sacco, Landeskog retained the “C” when the Avs fired Sacco in favor of Patrick Roy, and now retains it again over the third coaching change of his young career.

“It needs to be said that I respected Patty on and off the ice and I enjoyed working with him for three years,” Landeskog said, per the Post. “But I’m really exited about having Jared here. It feels like he brings in a lot of fresh air and comes in with a lot of optimism about this group.

“It feels like he believes in us.”

Landeskog is certainly one to watch this season. His game has gone in a bit of a strange direction since capturing the Calder in 2012, marked by a steady decline in offense (from 65 points in ’13-14, to 59 in ’14-15, to 53 last year) and an increase in disciplinary issues.

The 23-year-old was suspended three games in March for a “reckless and irresponsible” cross-check on Ducks d-man Simon Despres. Landeskog was visibly upset about his actions, especially given his leadership role and the fact the Avs were battling for their playoff lives.

But there were signs of a somewhat reckless player prior to the Despres incident. Last November, he was suspended two games for a dangerous hit on Brad Marchand.

These incidents could be why there was some question if Landeskog would retain his captaincy under Bednar.

On that note, one thing to mention — while Landeskog will keep wearing the “C”, it sounds as though there’ll be changes under him in the leadership group. Bednar said the alternate captain positions, previously held by veterans Jarome Iginla and Cody McLeod — are up for grabs.

The assistant captains and what we do with the rest of the group will be evaluated and then we’ll make decisions on that later on and whether it’s two guys, four guys, all the things that we want to consider as an organization,” Bednar said, per the Post. “We’re going to take the camp to evaluate it, just as we evaluate their play through camp and exhibition.”