Looking back at the most scandalous offer sheet dramas in NHL history

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kevinlowe.jpgI’ve stated this quite a bit the last few days, but it’s surprising NHL teams are so reluctant to send promising players offer sheets. I imagine there’s a lot of “Golden Rule” justification for staying away (“What if I’m in their shoes?,” general managers would shout), but … wouldn’t Bobby Ryan be worth a few bitter glances at the country club?

While the Sharks bidding for Niklas Hjalmarsson seems more like an exception to the rule, hockey does have an interesting history of offer sheets during the last 20 years or so. John Grigg presented his top 10 all-time offer sheet scandals today. Here’s the top three.

3. Scott Stevens, 1990
No one in league history has been as much of a poacher as former St. Louis GM Ron Caron. In 1990 he rolled the dice and made Washington’s Stevens the highest-paid blueliner in the NHL with a four-year, $5.1-million contract offer. An arbiter awarded the Capitals five first round draft picks, putting the Blues’ future pipeline into question.

2. Sergei Fedorov, 1998
The feud between Carolina owner Peter Karmanos and Detroit owner Mike Illitch is a famous one. And it was never more heated than when Karmanos attempted to lure Fedorov to the Hurricanes with a mammoth six-year, $38-million contract that could have paid the Russian up to $28 million with bonuses the first year (one of the clauses was based on the team making the semifinal, something the Canes were far less likely than Detroit to do). The Wings matched and the war continued.

1. Brendan Shanahan, 1991
A year after landing Stevens, Caron went after New Jersey’s burgeoning star winger Shanahan, trying to get him in a Blues uniform. He got his man when the Devils refused to match the offer, but the controversy didn’t end there. The teams went to arbitration, with the Blues offering Curtis Joseph, Rod Brind’Amour and two draft picks as compensation. But the arbiter leaned Jersey’s way and awarded the Devils – dah, de-da, dah – Scott Stevens… meaning the total cost to St. Louis for signing Shanny was five first round picks and Stevens. Ouch.

One name that showed up a lot on this list was Hall of Famer Scott Stevens. His contract situations factored into the top 10 twice (No. 10 in 1994 and No. 3 in 1990) and also were involved in Brendan Shanahan’s scenario, too.

Perhaps former St. Louis Blues GM Ron Caron was preaching my offer sheet gospel in the ’90s as he was clearly very aggressive in that department. (Then again, maybe all those burnt bridges explain why you don’t hear much about “The Old Professor”” anymore.)

The biggest, most recent year for crazy offer sheet situations was 2007. That was the year that Kevin Lowe angered Brian Burke by signing Dustin Penner to a hefty offer sheet while Lowe also forced the Buffalo Sabres to match his ridiculous five year, $50 million offer sheet for sniper Thomas Vanek. (The Sabres had little choice as their fans were already reeling from the loss of Chris Drury and Danny Briere … which, looking at the contracts of those players, actually turned out to be a good thing for money-challenged Buffalo.)

So, yes, it’s not the most socially acceptable thing to do, but offer sheet drama is very interesting when it does happen. Oh, and sometimes it can swing the very flow of the sport. (See: Stevens, Scott.)

Blues have ‘wiggle room’ after locking up Parayko

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The St. Louis Blues didn’t break the bank to keep Colton Parayko for five more years, and that’s important since they don’t believe the NHL’s salary cap will rise significantly in the next little while.

Parayko’s cap hit came in at a manageable $5.5 million, as the two sides narrowly avoided an arbitration hearing that was scheduled for today.

“You like to have as much wiggle room as possible,” GM Doug Armstrong said, per the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. “Now we view the cap will stay flat for the foreseeable future. We’re content with the space we have. We’ll move forward and get ready for training camp.”

The Blues now have a number of key players locked up long term, including Parayko, Alex Pietrangelo, Vladimir Tarasenko, Alex Steen, Jaden Schwartz, Patrik Berglund, and Jake Allen.

For Armstrong, the next big decision could involve Paul Stastny, the 31-year-old center who can become an unrestricted free agent next summer.

But a decision on Stastny doesn’t need to be made now, or even before the season starts. It’s the trade deadline that could be the real pressure point, akin to the Kevin Shattenkirk situation this past year.

Per CapFriendly, the Blues have just over $3 million in cap space, with one roster spot left to fill.

‘Highly unlikely’ Suns will pursue shared arena with Coyotes

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The Arizona Coyotes appear to be on their own in pursuit of a new arena in the Phoenix area.

That’s because Robert Sarver, the owner of the NBA’s Phoenix Suns, says it’s “highly unlikely” he’ll pursue a shared arena with the Coyotes.

Instead, Sarver is focused on upgrading the Suns’ current home (and Coyotes’ old home) in downtown Phoenix, Talking Stick Resort Arena.

From the Arizona Republic:

Sarver said building a new arena would have “maybe made more sense” four or five years ago when the cost estimate was $450 million to $500 million. The costs now, Sarver said, are “significantly higher.” Thus his focus on upgrading Talking Stick, which soon will be the second-oldest arena in the NBA.

“I think it’s the most economically viable alternative for the city and us,” he said. “I like downtown Phoenix. That’s my first preference. I think the NBA is more of an urban game. That’s our demographic.”

Talking Stick Resort Arena, formerly called America West Arena when the Coyotes played there, was designed for basketball and isn’t ideal for hockey. In that way, it’s a lot like Barclays Center in Brooklyn, which hasn’t been a great fit for the Islanders.

The Coyotes recently hired a new president and CEO, Steve Patterson, whose top priority is finding the team a new home in the Phoenix area.

Crosby to celebrate 30th birthday with Stanley Cup in Nova Scotia

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HALIFAX, Nova Scotia (AP) Sidney Crosby will mark his 30th birthday by once again parading the Stanley Cup in his province.

In tweets sent out by the Sidney Crosby Hockey School, Crosby said he would hoist the trophy in the streets of Halifax and Dartmouth as part of an annual civic parade.

“Get ready, the Stanley cup is coming to town!” Crosby confirmed in the tweet sent late Tuesday night. “I will be taking Lord Stanley to the streets Monday August 7th in the Halifax-Dartmouth Natal Day parade.”

The parade, part of annual events that celebrate Halifax’s birthday, also happens to fall on the Pittsburgh Penguins captain’s 30th birthday.

Natal Day chairman Greg Hayward said he expects another 25,000 people will be lining the parade route on top of the roughly 40,000 usual attendees.

“It’s extremely exciting to think that we’re going to have Sid and the Cup in our Natal Day parade,” Hayward said Wednesday.

Crosby has shown off the Stanley Cup twice before in his hometown of Cole Harbour, just outside Dartmouth, in 2009 and 2016.

Last July, Crosby carried the Cup in the back of a pickup that made its way to an arena in Cole Harbour as thousands of cheering fans looked on in sweltering heat.

Arbitration hearing looming for Arvidsson, who broke out in big way last year

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Viktor Arvidsson wants a one-year deal worth $4.5 million, while the Nashville Predators are countering with a two-year deal worth $5.5 million ($2.75 million AAV).

That’s the situation with an arbitration hearing scheduled for Saturday, according to Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman.

The two sides could still reach a deal before each case is heard.

Arvidsson, 24, broke out in a big way last year, scoring 31 goals during the regular season, then helping the Preds to their first Stanley Cup Final in franchise history.

But Nashville needs to be careful with its cap situation, because Ryan Johansen also needs a new contract, and he won’t be cheap to re-sign.

Arvidsson just wrapped up his entry-level contract.