Poacher's delight: This summer's best targets for offer sheets

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grossmanandryan.jpgSigning a player to an offer sheet is a risky, flawed endeavor. For one thing, the opposing team could match the offer sheet, like the Chicago Blackhawks did when the San Jose Sharks went after defenseman Niklas Hjalmarsson. It can be a mistake even if a team lands the player, as the more money you hand out, the more draft picks your team loses. So, it makes sense that offer sheets are a rare occurrence in the NHL.

Still, there’s so much talent out there – and so many cash-strapped teams – that I’m surprised general managers don’t roll the dice with offer sheets more often. With that thought in mind, I thought I’d take a look at the best possible options for potential poachers. Keep in mind that being a restricted free agent doesn’t guarantee that a player is susceptible to offer sheets; players like Antti Niemi who filed for salary arbitration aren’t available for such deals.

This isn’t a comprehensive list of restricted free agents (click here for that), either. Instead, it’s a list of the players I think could be worth a try, offer sheet-wise. I’ll provide a blurb for each player, but we might expand on some of the bigger names and/or most interesting options.

jamesneal18.jpgForwards
Bobby RyanThe Ducks are shooting down rumors of Ryan being traded for a reason; he’s a crucial player for Anaheim.
Bryan Little – He’d have more bargaining power if he scored 31 goals in 09-10, but instead he did so in 08-09.
Peter Mueller – Concussion issues cut his nice run in Colorado short, but Mueller showed some of the potential people were waiting for during his struggles with the Coyotes.
Chris Stewart – The budding power forward had a breakthrough sophomore season, with 28 goals and 64 points overall.
James Neal – He already has two 20-plus seasons in two NHL seasons so far. With the Stars’ money troubles, Neal could be an interesting target for opportunistic teams.
Justin Abdelkader – The man known as “Afrogator” doesn’t put up big numbers, but could be interesting.
Darren Helm – Helm is a classic hard-worker with questionable finishing ability. At the right price he could be a very useful player.
Sam Gagner – He’s fallen a bit short of his potential so far, but Gagner has loads of offensive talent.
Patric Hornqvist – Scored 30 goals under the radar in Nashville last season. He might be the league’s most underrated scorer.
Nick Foligno – He’s a lot like Abdelkader: a nice player without big numbers.
Darroll Powe – Another solid, scrappy player.
Martin Hanzal – While his career-high 35 points is far from amazing, his 6-5 frame impresses many.
Devin Setoguchi – A lot like Little, Setoguchi saw a big drop from 08-09 (65 points) to 09-10 (36).
David Perron – His career is coming along nicely, putting up 50 and 47 points the last two years.
Steve Downie – Bonehead or not, he proved to be more than a cheap shot artist with a 24 goal output in 09-10.

Erik Johnson.jpgDefensemen
Nicklas Grossman – He’s far from flashy, but Grossman is a solid, rugged blueliner.
Marc Staal – The Rangers are really struggling to sign the defensively sound member of the Staal clan.
Paul Ranger – Is he in Steve Yzerman’s plans? If not he could be a decent offensive defenseman somewhere else.
Erik Johnson – The No. 1 pick of the 2006 NHL Entry Draft has had his highs and lows, but he’s clearly a promising (and gifted) young defenseman. Edit: Ol Goaler states that Johnson won’t qualify for an offer sheet thanks to his golf cart injury-related lost season.
Cody Franson – He’s a bit before his prime, but Franson has some definite promise.

Goalies
Ondrej Pavelec – He had a decent mini-run this season, but my guess is demand will be low for him.
Josh Harding – One of the best backup goalies in the league, Harding would probably get more attention if it wasn’t such a horrible market for goalies this summer.
Carey Price – The Habs seem more or less forced to sign him, but you never know with that odd Montreal franchise.

Cullen signs with Wild, opting against retirement (and Penguins)

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Matt Cullen is going home, but that doesn’t mean that he’s retiring from hockey.

Instead, the Minnesota native decided to sign a one-year, $1 million deal with the Minnesota Wild. It’s unclear why, precisely, Cullen didn’t ink a deal to try to “threepeat” with the Pittsburgh Penguins.

The Wild note that his deal also includes $700K in potential performance bonuses.

This will be the 40-year-old’s second run with the Wild. His first run came from 2010-11 through 2012-13, where he appeared in 193 regular-season games and five postseason contests for Minnesota.

Cullen managed back-to-back 30+ point seasons with the Penguins while providing useful all-around play as a veteran center. If he can maintain a reasonably high level of play, this gives the Wild quite the solid group down the middle, even with Martin Hanzal gone.

Oilers ink Draisaitl to monster eight-year, $68 million deal

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The Edmonton Oilers have locked up their cornerstone players for the foreseeable future.

They didn’t come cheap.

Just weeks after signing Connor McDavid to a eight-year, $100 million deal, the Oilers signed fellow forward Leon Draisaitl to an eight-year, $68 million deal. The contract carries a $8.5M average annual cap hit and, combined with McDavid’s $12.5M, will now cost the Oilers $21M annually through 2025.

McDavid certainly warranted his payday. The same can be said of Draisaitl.

The 21-year-old just wrapped his three-year, entry-level deal, and couldn’t have done so in finer fashion. Draisaitl enjoyed a terrific season, platooning between the second-line center position and the wing alongside McDavid, and finished with 29 goals and 77 points.

Then, the playoffs happened.

Draisaitl had a terrific postseason, racking up six goals and 16 points in 13 games. At the time of elimination he was sitting second among all scorers — trailing only Evgeni Malkin — and was downright brilliant in Edmonton’s seven-game loss to Anaheim, finishing with 13 points.

More to follow…

 

Report: Vegas among teams in on Pens draftee Byron

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Will Butcher isn’t the only college free agent garnering interest in free agency.

University of Maine senior Blaine Byron, Pittsburgh’s sixth-round pick in ’13, has passed on signing with the club and can now ink with a team of his choosing. Per The Hockey News, the four “lead suitors” for Byron are Vegas, New Jersey, Ottawa and Buffalo.

Byron, 22, is coming off a great year. He racked up 18 goals and 41 points in 36 games, finishing tied for 18th in the country in scoring. It’s unclear where he would’ve fit in the Pittsburgh organization, though, and one has to think the signing of Northeastern’s Zach Aston-Reese might’ve played a factor in his departure.

In a recent Tribune-Review piece, Byron did make a list of the club’s top-20 prospects, coming in at No. 17.

Yesterday, Butcher — the reigning Hobey Baker winner — announced that he wouldn’t sign with Colorado, the team that drafted him four years ago. Instead, Butcher will parlay a successful senior campaign at Denver University into interest on the open market.

Under Pressure: Barry Trotz

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This post is part of Capitals Day on PHT…

When the Capitals hired Barry Trotz three years ago, they said he was “the only coach we coveted,” calling him “an ideal fit to help lead our club.”

And in many ways, Trotz has been an ideal fit. He’s led to the club to consecutive Presidents’ Trophies, racking up 156 wins over the course of three seasons. He won the 2016 Jack Adams as coach of the year. Players have performed exceptionally well on his watch: Braden Holtby won his first-ever Vezina, Alex Ovechkin racked up a pair of Rocket Richard trophies and both Nicklas Backstrom and Evgeny Kuznetsov were named All-Stars.

Despite all this, Trotz is now coaching for his job. Essentially.

A string of disheartening playoff failures — each more painful than the last — have put him in an uncomfortable and pressure-packed situation. He’s heading into the the last of his four-year deal with no contract certainty beyond.

Yes, it’s true Caps GM Brian MacLellan didn’t make any changes with Trotz or to his coaching staff following the Game 7 loss to Pittsburgh.

But MacLellan didn’t offer an extension, either.

Brian Burke once likened this scenario to being a lame duck. Trotz refused to see it that way, insisting that he wasn’t worried about the spot he was in.

“No,” he told CSN Mid Atlantic in June, when asked if not having a contract changes his approach at all. “It has 0.0 effect on me, actually. Not at all. I think it might have [had] an effect 10, 12 years ago for me. Not now. It has zero effect.

“I’m not worrying about that at all.”

This is pretty much on par with Trotz’s messaging from the moment Washington crashed out of the playoffs. While his players were visibly dejected and downright hurt during locker clean-out day, the 55-year-old was upbeat.

Defiant, almost.

Trotz talked about how the team’s window wasn’t closed, and how it would eventually “break through that barrier.” He suggested “laughing at the past” could “ease us into the future.”

The assembled media took note of this, which contrasted the vibe of his visibly distraught players. So it was asked — why did he seem more upbeat than his players?

From the Washington Post:

“Put it this way — I haven’t slept in two friggin’ days. To say that I don’t feel very distraught, that really sort of angers me, because talk to my family to see if I’m distraught.

“I have to be positive in terms of, ‘do I think we’re going in the right direction?’ Yes, and I’m positive of that. But we haven’t broken through. That’s why I’m probably the way I am. I also said we didn’t get to where we wanted to get to.

“That angers me. When something doesn’t go your way, you can roll up in a ball and feel sorry for yourself. I don’t.”

That Trotz took this approach isn’t surprising. Coaching is a leadership role, and there didn’t seem to be any point to piling onto what was already a fairly miserable day in D.C.

So hey, why not keep that vibe going when it comes to contract uncertainty?

Trotz will likely continue to do so, even in the face of growing pressure. And pressure will continue to grow. Remember, there’s one final and very important dynamic at play — right next to Trotz behind the Washington bench is assistant coach Todd Reirden. The same Todd Reirden who’s thought to be a head-coach-in-waiting, and has been tied to previous openings in Colorado and Florida.

Fun times in Washington. As they always are.