Could fallen stars Cheechoo, Kariya and Tanguay be worth a look?


tanguayshoots.jpgWhile tomorrow’s “free agent frenzy” should provide plenty of splashy moves and interesting deals, there is a slight sense that most NHL teams made it to the buffet table after Overeaters Anonymous already ran wild on the good stuff. Aside from the soon-to-be-rich(er) Ilya Kovalchuk, most of the restricted and unrestricted free agents are far from marquee talent.

So teams in need of offense might have to go to the bargain bin (I mean, unless they wildly overpay one of these guys). It can be awfully risky to hope that a player discovers the Hockey Fountain of Youth, but if a fallen star is willing to take less years and salary to attempt a career re-boot, everyone can win. It usually doesn’t work out that way, but every once in a while you see a situation like Teemu Selanne returning to Anaheim to light up the league.

Let’s take a look at three stars-turned-fringe-NHL’ers and see who might make sense.

Paul Kariya – While people rattle of names like Wade Redden and Cristobal Huet, I noted that Kariya flew under the radar as someone who practically stole money from his team. Kariya didn’t justify his $6 million cap hit during a single season in St. Louis, suffering from injuries and his own indifference in three mediocre campaigns. The small winger doesn’t have any jam to his game and won’t help you on defense, so you basically have to hope that he could score a lot at a low price. He’s also set to turn 36 in the 10-11 season, so a team better not give him more than two years.Thumbnail image for Kariya.jpg

I’m not a Kariya fan, but I guess it’s not impossible for him to flourish if someone talented was “baby birding” him points.

Jonathan Cheechoo – Cheechoo is a member of the “Joe Thornton Millionaire’s Club”, standing alongside such luminaries as Sergei Samsonov. There are two things that explain the winger’s plunge from a 56-goal Maurice Richard season: 1) no longer playing with Thornton and 2) injury troubles. It’s difficult to argue with Ken Warren of the Ottawa Citizen, who says that his career in the NHL is likely over.

Alex Tanguay – When the Tampa Bay Lightning landed Tanguay for what seemed like a frugal $2.5 million, I thought it would be one of the best bargains of last summer. Instead, he languished with a career-worst 37 point campaign. He’s now three seasons removed from being a point-per-game player and, like Kariya, doesn’t bring much to the table when he isn’t producing points. Still, I think if he takes a direction that Kariya should look into (going for a one-year, dirt-cheap retribution deal), he might just rejuvenate his flailing career.

While Cheechoo looks done, Tanguay and Kariya should be able to find at least a couple semi-interested suitors. Should your team go after one of these low-rent former stars? Tell us in the comments.

Cocaine in the NHL: A concern, but not a crisis?

Montreal Canadiens v Minnesota Wild
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Does the NHL have a cocaine problem?

TSN caught up with deputy commissioner Bill Daly, who provided some fascinating insight:

“The number of [cocaine] positives are more than they were in previous years and they’re going up,” Daly said. “I wouldn’t say it’s a crisis in any sense. What I’d say is drugs like cocaine are cyclical and you’ve hit a cycle where it’s an ‘in’ drug again.”


Daly said that he’d be surprised  “if we’re talking more than 20 guys” and then touched on something that may be a problem: they don’t test it in a “comprehensive way.”

As Katie Strang’s essential ESPN article about the Los Angeles Kings’ tough season explored in June, there are some challenges for testing for a drug like cocaine. That said, there are also some limitations that may raise some eyebrows.

For one, it metabolizes quickly. Michael McCabe, a Philadelphia-based toxicology expert who works for Robson Forensic, told that, generally speaking, cocaine filters out of the system in two to four days, making it relatively easy to avoid a flag in standard urine tests.

The NHL-NHLPA’s joint drug-testing program is not specifically designed to target recreational drugs such as cocaine or marijuana. The Performance Enhancing Substances Program is put into place to do exactly that — screen for performance-enhancing drugs.

So, are “party drugs” like cocaine and molly an issue for the NHL?

At the moment, the answer almost seems to be: “the league hopes not.”

Daly goes into plenty of detail on the issue, so read the full TSN article for more.

Jason Demers tweets #FreeTorres, gets mocked

Los Angeles Kings v San Jose Sharks - Game One

Following his stunning 41-game suspension, it looks like Raffi Torres has at least one former teammate in his corner.

We haven’t yet seen how the San Jose Sharks or the NHLPA are reacting to the league’s hammer-dropping decision to punish Torres for his Torres-like hit on Jakob Silfverberg, but Jason Demers decided to put in a good word for Torres tonight.

It was a simple message: “#FreeTorres.”

Demers, now of the Dallas Stars, was once with Torres and the Sharks. (In case this post’s main image didn’t make that clear enough already.)

Perhaps this will become “a thing” at some point.

So far, it seems like it’s instead “a thing (that people are making fun of).”

… You get the idea.

The bottom line is that there are some who either a) blindly support Torres because they’re Sharks fans or b) simply think that the punishment was excessive.

The most important statement came from the Department of Player Safety, though.