2010 Hockey Hall of Fame inductees: Ciccarelli, Granato, James, Devellano and Seaman


Thumbnail image for ciccarelli.jpgThe 2010 Hockey Hall of Fame inductees were just announced. For players, Dino Ciccarelli joins first-time female nominees Cammi Granato and Angela James. Jimmy Devellano and Daryl “Doc” Seaman were elected as “builders.” I conducted a survey of the PHT Staff (myself, Brandon and Joe) plus 10 hockey bloggers and the inductees we chose were very, very different.

While the real-life committee chose Ciccarelli, Granato, James, Devellano and Seaman, we chose Joe Nieuwendyk, Doug Gilmour, Adam Oates and Ciccarelli. That’s a pretty stunning disparity, and frankly, I think our group is a better depiction of hockey royalty than the ones who made it in reality.

Nieuwendyk received 10 out of 13 possible votes in our poll … did the committee just decide that he wasn’t first-ballot material? Adam Oates is the leading scorer among eligible players who aren’t already in the Hall of Fame and Joe Yerdon will surely have a conniption that he was snubbed once again. Doug Gilmour and others also have plenty to complain about.

It’s great to see women inducted, but it would have felt better if the group looked something like Nieuwendyk, Ciccarelli, Granato and James instead. I’d like to see the voting results or at least hear about some of the reasoning; dare I ask if politics decided it rather than on-ice achievements?

(Besides, if voters wanted to tug on heart strings … have they heard of the name Pat Burns? He’s plenty deserving of a nod and his health problems justify “rushing” him in. Oh well, I’ll move on.)

That being said, I thought I’d give a quick summary of each inductee’s contributions to the sport.

Ciccarelli – A great selection considering his stout combination of points (1200) and penalty minutes (1425). Many speculate he would have made the HHOF sooner if he didn’t have some off-ice issues.

Thumbnail image for granato.jpgGranato – Cammi Granato was – and in many ways still is – the face of women’s hockey in the United States. She won a gold medal in 1998 and a silver medal in 2002. She also appeared in nearly every international tournament U.S. women’s hockey appeared in.

James – Called the “Wayne Gretzky of women’s hockey.” She scored 34 points in 20 games in four women’s world championships and found herself inducted into a litany of different athletic Hall of Fames.

Devellano – I think these three paragraphs from his Detroit Red Wings biography capture Devellano’s well-earned place in the HHOF. (I cut out some of the extraneous information, though.)

Devellano was one of the first NHL general managers to assemble a strong European scouting staff back in 1984, a progressive move that has produced several Red Wing standouts including Russians Sergei Fedorov, Slava Kozlov, Vladimir Konstantinov and Pavel Datsyuk, and Swedes Nicklas Lidstrom, Tomas Holmstrom, Henrik Zetterberg, Johan Franzen and Niklas Kronwall.

Through the course of Devellano’s tenure with the Red Wings, Detroit has participated in ten conference finals and six Stanley Cup finals, collected six Presidents’ Trophies, eight regular-season Western Conference championships and 15 division championships.

Devellano is the proud owner of 14 championship rings. His impressive collection includes: seven Stanley Cup rings (N.Y. Islanders 1980, 1981, 1982 and Detroit 1997, 1998, 2002 and 2008), three Calder Cup championship rings in the American Hockey League with Adirondack (1986, 1989 and 1992), two Adams Cup championship rings in the Central Hockey League (Fort Worth 1978 and Indianapolis 1982), and one Riley Cup championship ring in the East Coast Hockey League (Toledo 1994). Devellano also added a Major League Baseball American League championship ring with the Detroit Tigers in 2006.

Now, that is a Hall of Fame resume. Wow.

Seaman: Sadly, this is a posthumous honor for “Doc” since he died from prostate cancer in 2009. He was part of the original group who bought the Calgary Flames and was one of their owners when the team won a Stanley Cup in 1989.

Kings grab goalie insurance by signing Budaj

LOS ANGELES, CA - SEPTEMBER 22: Jhonas Enroth #1 and Peter Budaj #31 of the Los Angeles Kings stretch before a game against the Arizona Coyotes at STAPLES Center on September 22, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Andrew D. Bernstein/NHLI via Getty Images)
via Los Angeles Kings
Leave a comment

In slightly less interesting Los Angeles Kings news than the latest in the Mike Richards fiasco, the team handed Peter Budaj a one-year, two-way deal on Friday.

The veteran goalie’s contract pays $575K on the NHL level and $100K in the AHL (though it’s $150K guaranteed), according to Hockey’s Cap.

At the moment, it sounds like Budaj will be third on the Kings’ goalie depth chart. That says as much about how things have been going lately for Los Angeles than Budaj’s work on a PTO.

As noted above, one of the more significant moves in Budaj’s favor came when the New York Islanders claimed Jean-Francois Berube off of waivers this week.

The Kings actually waived Budaj before signing him, so this has to be a relief to a goalie with a fairly robust resume as a backup.

All apologies to Budaj, but it’s probably true that the Kings would prefer not to see him at the NHL level very often in 2015-16.

Kings, NHLPA announce settlement in Richards grievance

Los Angeles Kings v New York Rangers

The Los Angeles Kings announced today that they have “reached an agreement with Mike Richards to resolve the grievance filed in relation to the termination of his NHL Standard Players Contract. The terms are agreeable to all parties.”

The club said that it will not be commenting further “on the terms” of the settlement.

The NHLPA released a similar statement.

It was reported earlier in the week that a settlement was close to being reached; however, it wasn’t clear what salary-cap penalties the Kings would incur.

We’re starting to find out some details now:

How the final numbers differ from what the Kings would have incurred if they’d bought Richards out will be interesting to see. And if there are differences, how will they be justified?

Stay tuned.