2010 Hockey Hall of Fame inductees: Ciccarelli, Granato, James, Devellano and Seaman

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Thumbnail image for ciccarelli.jpgThe 2010 Hockey Hall of Fame inductees were just announced. For players, Dino Ciccarelli joins first-time female nominees Cammi Granato and Angela James. Jimmy Devellano and Daryl “Doc” Seaman were elected as “builders.” I conducted a survey of the PHT Staff (myself, Brandon and Joe) plus 10 hockey bloggers and the inductees we chose were very, very different.

While the real-life committee chose Ciccarelli, Granato, James, Devellano and Seaman, we chose Joe Nieuwendyk, Doug Gilmour, Adam Oates and Ciccarelli. That’s a pretty stunning disparity, and frankly, I think our group is a better depiction of hockey royalty than the ones who made it in reality.

Nieuwendyk received 10 out of 13 possible votes in our poll … did the committee just decide that he wasn’t first-ballot material? Adam Oates is the leading scorer among eligible players who aren’t already in the Hall of Fame and Joe Yerdon will surely have a conniption that he was snubbed once again. Doug Gilmour and others also have plenty to complain about.

It’s great to see women inducted, but it would have felt better if the group looked something like Nieuwendyk, Ciccarelli, Granato and James instead. I’d like to see the voting results or at least hear about some of the reasoning; dare I ask if politics decided it rather than on-ice achievements?

(Besides, if voters wanted to tug on heart strings … have they heard of the name Pat Burns? He’s plenty deserving of a nod and his health problems justify “rushing” him in. Oh well, I’ll move on.)

That being said, I thought I’d give a quick summary of each inductee’s contributions to the sport.

Ciccarelli – A great selection considering his stout combination of points (1200) and penalty minutes (1425). Many speculate he would have made the HHOF sooner if he didn’t have some off-ice issues.

Thumbnail image for granato.jpgGranato – Cammi Granato was – and in many ways still is – the face of women’s hockey in the United States. She won a gold medal in 1998 and a silver medal in 2002. She also appeared in nearly every international tournament U.S. women’s hockey appeared in.

James – Called the “Wayne Gretzky of women’s hockey.” She scored 34 points in 20 games in four women’s world championships and found herself inducted into a litany of different athletic Hall of Fames.

Devellano – I think these three paragraphs from his Detroit Red Wings biography capture Devellano’s well-earned place in the HHOF. (I cut out some of the extraneous information, though.)

Devellano was one of the first NHL general managers to assemble a strong European scouting staff back in 1984, a progressive move that has produced several Red Wing standouts including Russians Sergei Fedorov, Slava Kozlov, Vladimir Konstantinov and Pavel Datsyuk, and Swedes Nicklas Lidstrom, Tomas Holmstrom, Henrik Zetterberg, Johan Franzen and Niklas Kronwall.

Through the course of Devellano’s tenure with the Red Wings, Detroit has participated in ten conference finals and six Stanley Cup finals, collected six Presidents’ Trophies, eight regular-season Western Conference championships and 15 division championships.

Devellano is the proud owner of 14 championship rings. His impressive collection includes: seven Stanley Cup rings (N.Y. Islanders 1980, 1981, 1982 and Detroit 1997, 1998, 2002 and 2008), three Calder Cup championship rings in the American Hockey League with Adirondack (1986, 1989 and 1992), two Adams Cup championship rings in the Central Hockey League (Fort Worth 1978 and Indianapolis 1982), and one Riley Cup championship ring in the East Coast Hockey League (Toledo 1994). Devellano also added a Major League Baseball American League championship ring with the Detroit Tigers in 2006.

Now, that is a Hall of Fame resume. Wow.

Seaman: Sadly, this is a posthumous honor for “Doc” since he died from prostate cancer in 2009. He was part of the original group who bought the Calgary Flames and was one of their owners when the team won a Stanley Cup in 1989.

Talks ongoing between Wild and Dumba, meeting expected soon

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There’s just one piece of business left for Minnesota this summer — a new contract for RFA defenseman Matt Dumba.

And it sounds like that piece of business will soon be attended to.

From the Star-Tribune:

There have been ongoing talks between Wild assistant GM Brent Flahr and [Dumba’s] agent Craig Oster.

The two are expected to meet face to face in Calgary at the Hockey Canada camp.

Dumba, the former No. 7 overall pick, just wrapped his entry-level deal, coming off a campaign in which he set career highs in games played (81), goals (10) and points (26).

He also notched a pair of assists in the Wild’s six-game loss to Dallas in the playoffs.

Dumba, 22, did see his name surface in trade talks this season. There was a report in late January that he was the return piece in a potential swap for Tampa Bay’s Jonathan Drouin, and he’s been tied to teams looking for a blueline upgrade.

A good puck mover with offensive skills — and a right-handed shot — Dumba is definitely a commodity. What’s more, logic suggests the Wild could opt to move him, given the long-term financial commitments to fellow defensemen Ryan Suter (signed through 2025 at $7.53 million), Jonas Brodin (2021 at $4.16M), Jared Suprgeon (2020, $5.18M) and Marco Scandella (2020, $4M).

Minnesota has some other young defensive prospects in the system, too.

There’s former Gophers standout Mike Reilly, Miami of Ohio product Louis Belpedio and Gustav Olofsson, the 46th overall pick in ’13 that’s been honing his game in AHL Iowa (and made his NHL debut last season).

The Wild are in control of the Dumba situation and can slow play negotiations, possibly while re-exploring trade scenarios. Don’t forget the Bruins are still in search of the “transitional” defenseman they desperately want.

But should things go the expected way and Dumba re-signs in Minnesota, the Star-Tribune said a bridge deal is the “likeliest” outcome.

Journeyman enforcer Rosehill signs with Scottish team

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Noted pugilist Jay Rosehill has followed in the footsteps of his fellow tough guys, and will try his hand overseas.

Specifically, in the United Kingdom.

On Tuesday, the EIHL’s Scottish-based outfit in Braehead — the Clan — announced it had signed Rosehill for the upcoming campaign. The move comes after the 31-year-old spent each of the last two seasons with Philly’s AHL affiliate in Lehigh Valley.

Though he’s slowed down in recent years, Rosehill has long been known as an extremely active fighter. At no time was this more evident than during the ’08-09 campaign, when he fought a staggering 33 times (yeah, thirty-three) while playing for AHL Norfolk.

Rosehill last played in the NHL during the ’13-14 campaign, scoring two goals in 34 games for the Flyers — while racking up 90 PIM.

Here’s an example of some of his most famous handiwork:

As mentioned above, the EIHL has landed a few notable ex-NHL fighters. Cam Janssen, Kevin Westgarth, Paul Bissonnette and Tom Sestito have all played there.

 

 

Veteran d-man Foster retires, moves into coaching

UNIONDALE, NY - DECEMBER 13:  Kurtis Foster #26 of the Minnesota Wild looks on during their NHL game against the New York Islanders on December 13, 2005 at Nassau Coliseum in Uniondale, New York.  The Wild defeated the Islanders 4-3.  (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
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Kurtis Foster, who appeared in over 400 games during a 10-year NHL career, is hanging up his skates to enter the next phase of his hockey life — coaching.

Foster, 34, has rejoined his former junior team in OHL Peterborough as an assistant coach, per the Examiner. The decision comes after Foster spent the last three years playing overseas in the KHL and, most recently, in the German League.

The 40th overall pick in 2000, Foster is often remembered for a horrific leg break while playing for Minnesota during the 2007-08 campaign, in which his femur was shattered by Torrey Mitchell after Mitchell tried to prevent an icing call.

The severity of the collision and Foster’s injury — he underwent emergency surgery, nearly bled out and almost lost his leg — prompted an immediate rule tweak from the NHL, and has since been viewed as a catalyst for the league’s adoption of no-touch icing.

Impressively, Foster recovered from the broken femur to post a career-high 42 points in 74 games with the Lightning in ’09-10.

In addition to the Wild and Bolts, Foster spent time with the Thrashers, Oilers, Ducks, Devils and Flyers.

University of Denver standout Moore goes pro, signs with Leafs

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Trevor Moore, an undrafted junior out of the University of Denver, has opted to bypass his senior campaign by signing a three-year, entry-level deal with the Leafs, the club announced on Tuesday.

Here’s what Moore, 21, has accomplished over the last three years:

[Moore] skated in 40 games with the University of Denver (NCHC) this past season, collecting 44 points (11 goals, 33 assists) and eight penalty minutes. He finished tied for sixth in the conference scoring race with 35 points (nine goals, 26 assists) in 31 games.

In 121 career games at Denver, the Thousand Oaks, California native registered 120 points (47 goals, 73 assists). Moore was named to the NCHC First All-Star Team and was the conference’s forward of the year during the 2014-15 season. In 2013-14, Moore was named to the NCHC All-Rookie Team.

Moore scored his ELC after performing well at Toronto’s prospects camp earlier this month, and looks to be on his way to the Marlies for next season.

If you’re wondering why Moore was passed over at the draft, do consider the Pioneers website lists him — perhaps generously — at 5-foot-9, 175 pounds.

Of course, Toronto does have a similarly diminutive player right near the top of the organizational prospect pool in Mitch Marner,  currently listed at 5-foot-11, 160 pounds. It’s probably worth noting that Moore and Marner skated together at prospects camp.