Ciccarelli, Cold War-era Russians deserve some HOF attention, too


With the announcement of the 2010 Hockey Hall of Fame inductions set for Tuesday, we’re gearing up for some fun features here at PHT. In a few hours, I’ll share the staff “ballots” as well as choices made by some of our favorite hockey bloggers. Last night, the big debate was whether or not Pavel Bure and Eric Lindros are worthy Hall of Fame inductees.

While Lindros, Bure and a few others will garner most of the attention and debate, I thought it would be wise to mention some candidates who likely won’t get much attention.

(Note: I reserve the right to be wrong since you never know, these players might end up winning the blogger – or even real life – battle to get in the Hall of Fame.)

First, here are three suggestions from esteemed Minnesota hockey writer Michael Russo.

This is not the strongest class — at least the least-strongest since the year after the lockout. So could this finally be Dino Ciccarelli’s year? There are 18 600-goal scorers in the history of the league and Ciccarelli and Dave Andreychuk are the only eligible 600-goal scorers who aren’t in the Hall. That’s a ton of goals.

I reached out to Dino, but he’d prefer not to say anything prior to the selection committee meeting and announcement Tuesday. Here’s his bio on the HHOF web site. By the way, I think I mentioned in April, but I actually watched Game 7 of the Phoenix-Detroit series with Dino in western Florida at Columbus play-by-play guy Jeff Rimer’s home. Dino still looks like he can strap on the skates.

Could this maybe be Phil Housley’s year? He’s the highest-scoring American defenseman ever.

I get the feeling that Dave Andreychuk will get some attention, too, but Ciccarelli and Housley are interesting choices in their own right.

One of the toughest things to way is success in another league. How do you factor in, say, Warren Moon’s non-NFL days or Bobby Hull’s many WHA goals? Joe Pelletier brings up a few of the best players from those great Russian national teams who haven’t made the Hall of Fame yet, but never received a fair shake in the NHL (thanks to that whole “Cold War” thing?).

Their respective tenures in the NHL, Krutov’s in particular, are remembered as busts. Makarov put together a couple of nice seasons, but without Larionov’s command of English and unquenchable taste for Western life, neither Krutov and Makarov, like so many other Russian stars of the 1980s, ever really had much of a chance of excelling in North America at their advanced age.

Igor Larionov was the unselfish and brainy chessmaster of the KLM Line. With his help, both Vladimir Krutov and Sergei Makarov harnessed their near-limitless raw talent and became the best players in the world.

I am absolutely convinced that both Krutov and Makarov are among the top 5 wingers of the 1980s. I would suggest only Mike Bossy and Jari Kurri would challenge either for top billing, with Michel Goulet maybe rounding out the top 5.

So, do you think crucial (but slightly less famous) members of the old “Big Red Machine” should be given more consideration? What about Dino Ciccarelli, Dave Andreychuk or Phil Housley? Are there others – say, Mike Richter – who come to mind as dark horse candidates? Share your thoughts in the comments.

Dropping like flies: Johnson, Killorn hurt in Bolts’ exhibition

Montreal Canadiens v Tampa Bay Lightning - Game One
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You probably know the drill: injury updates are murky in the NHL basically from the moment a puck drops.

We’ll learn more once the 2015-16 season begins, but at the moment, Saturday might have served as a costly night for the Tampa Bay Lightning. Both Tyler Johnson and Alex Killorn went down with injuries stemming from a 3-2 pre-season win against the Florida Panthers.

“Guys were dropping like flies,” Steven Stamkos told the Tamba Bay Times.

These could be minor situations – just about any ailment will sideline a key asset this time of year – yet one cannot help but wonder if the Lightning might limp into this campaign.

Nikita Kucherov is dealing with his own issues, so that means at least minor issues for one half of the Bolts’ top six forwards.

It’s believed that more will be known about these banged-up Bolts sometime on Sunday.

Raffi Torres gets match penalty for being Raffi Torres

Raffi Torres

With knee issues still limiting him, Raffi Torres isn’t as mobile as he once was. Apparently he still moves well enough to leave the usual path of destruction.

It’s the pre-season, so it’s unclear if we’ll get a good look at the check, but Torres received a match penalty for his hit on Anaheim Ducks forward Jakob Silfverberg.

Most accounts were pretty critical of the San Jose Sharks’ chief troublemaker:

It’s too early to tell if Silfverberg is injured. If he is, that’s a significant loss for the Ducks, as he really showed signs of fulfilling his promise (especially during the 2015 playoffs).

As far as Torres goes, he’s hoping to play in the Sharks’ season-opener. Wherever he ends up, he’ll certainly make plenty of enemies on the ice.

Whether it was because of that hit or just the general distaste shared by those sides, it sounds like tonight’s Sharks – Ducks exhibition is getting ugly, in general:

This post will be updated if video of the hit becomes available, and also if we get a better idea of Silfverberg’s condition.

Update: All that’s been announced about Silfverberg is that he’s under evaluation and will not return.