Dallas Stars sale down to two Canadian businessmen

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Hicks2.jpgDallas Stars fans, start rejoicing.

The time when Tom Hicks is
no longer the owner of the Stars is drawing ever closer, which can only
be a relief during a time in which the team is completely handcuffed
financially. Hicks Sports Group, the holding company that owns the
Stars, is locked in a financial battle to pay back $525 million in
defaulted loans — HSG is currently attempting sell the Texas Rangers,
and now it seems that the sale of the Dallas Stars is getting ready to
take the next step.

David Shoalts of the Globe and Mail is
reporting that according to his sources, the next owner of the Dallas
Stars will be one of two Canadian businessmen.

The local potential
ownership group, fronted by Jim Lites and with Mike Modano as a
potential member, has fallen out of contention for ownership of the
Stars according to Shoalts.

So that leaves Calgary oil businessman
Bill Gallacher and Vancouver businessman Tom Gaglardi. Per Shoalts:

At this point, there is no favourite in this race but the clear winners
barring any surprise developments will be the NHL and Dallas hockey
fans. If either Gallacher or Gaglardi is presented to the league
governors for approval this summer, it will be a second home run on the
ownership front for NHL commissioner Gary Bettman after some
embarrassing whiffs. Both men have deep pockets, something of a rarity
among NHL owners in recent years.

The key words there are “deep pockets”. As Hicks’ spending habits
started to dry up, so did the Stars ability to continue to maintain a
high level of success. While there certainly some growing pains
associated with the transition to Joe Nieuwendyk’s and coach Marc
Crawford’s new system, it’s seemed for the past few seasons that the
Stars were just a few players away from truly being special —
especially on defense.

The Stars are currently sitting $14 million or so under the salary
cap with six spots open on the roster. In reality, the team is
handcuffed by an internal budget that likely limits the Stars to $10
million under the cap; a very painful proposition for fans that see a
team on the cusp of making the next step.

While Gallacher would be a welcome addition to the NHL and to Dallas, you have to think that Tom Gaglardi would ultimately be the best choice. He is part owner of the Kamloops Blazers and has ties with the NHL already. Gallacher’s deep pockets would be welcome, certainly, but one with deep pockets and an in with the league would be welcomed with open arms.

It’s highly unlikely that a change in ownership will be able to help
the Stars this summer — free agency begins in July and the board of
governors still needs to vote on which ownership group they’d approve.
It’s more than likely that both Gaglardi and Gallacher would be easily
approved, it’s just a matter now of HSG and Tom Hicks deciding on the
better offer. According to Shoalts, the team could be sold for between
$200 and $240 million “depending on how the team’s debt under current
owner Tom Hicks is handled.” Still, a change in ownership this summer
will certainly free up the team for any moves they need to make next
season.

The Stars have seen revenue drop a bit recently, after years of being
one of the highest revenue-producing teams in the NHL. They missed the
playoffs two years in a row for the first time since moving to Dallas
and there is not doubt that the team has taken a backseat to the Dallas
Cowboys, Dallas Mavericks and Texas Rangers — a dangerous position to
be in for hockey in North Texas.

Yet I can tell you that an eager and enthusiastic owner, one who is
smart and yet still willing to spend the money, has the ability to make
Dallas a hockey crazy city once more. The team has recently taken steps
to lower ticket prices and get away from the “corporate” reputation that
had surrounded the team since moving to American Airlines Center — the
lower bowl, once dominated by business-owned season ticket holders, is
now being catered to the true fan.

Whether it’s Bill Gallacher or Tom Gaglardi, there’s no doubt that
the change will be good not only for the Dallas Stars and the fans but
for the NHL as well. Hockey is amazingly popular in Texas and the league
needs for the Stars to be successful. More importantly, the team needs
an owner that knows what it takes to build a successful team. Hicks’
strategy was to hand over control to Bob Gainey and then sit back and
reap the benefits; since his departure as GM it’s been nothing but a
downward spiral.

Red Wings, DeKeyser settle on six-year, $30 million contract

Detroit Red Wings v Tampa Bay Lightning - Game Seven
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Cancel Danny DeKeyser‘s arbitration hearing on Thursday; it won’t be required.

DeKeyser has agreed on a six-year, $30 million contract with the Detroit Red Wings. The 26-year-old defenseman is now locked up through 2021-22.

Next up for GM Ken Holland is goalie Petr Mrazek‘s arbitration hearing tomorrow. That hearing, which came at the club’s request, may actually be necessary.

DeKeyser’s deal, on the other hand, always seemed like it would be the easier of the two to get done via negotiation.

“The player and the club both know what the range would be on a one-year deal,” Holland said recently, per the Detroit Free Press. “We continue to have conversation on a longer-term deal. I’m comfortable we can avoid the process. Danny is Detroit born, he’s happy with his role, happy to be a Red Wing. We are happy with his play.”

DeKeyser had eight goals and 12 assists in 78 games last season, while logging an average ice time of 21:48. As an NHLer, he’s proven why he was such a highly sought-after college free agent, and his new contract reflects that.

Rangers sign Russian d-man Zborovskiy to ELC

CALGARY, AB - OCTOBER 19:  Pavel Karnaukhov #9 of the Calgary Hitmen is checked by Sergey Zborovskiy #2 of the Regina Pats during a WHL game at Scotiabank Saddledome on October 19, 2014 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. (Photo by Derek Leung/Getty Images)
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The Rangers inked one of their better young blueline prospects on Monday, agreeing to terms with Sergey Zborovskiy on a three-year, entry-level deal.

Zborovskiy, 19, was New York’s third-round pick (79th) overall at the 2015 draft, a selection acquired as part of the Cam Talbot trade to Edmonton. He’s spent the last two seasons with WHL Regina, racking up eight goals and 25 points in 64 games last season.

At 6-foot-3 and 198 pounds, Zborovskiy has good size, one of the reasons the Rangers were high on him.

Per TVA, the Russian rearguard signed a deal that will pay $633,000 annually at the NHL level. Zborovskiy is expected to return to junior next year.

Ducks sign former first-rounder Noesen to one-year extension

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ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) Forward Stefan Noesen has agreed to a one-year contract to stay with the Anaheim Ducks.

Anaheim confirmed the two-way deal Monday.

Noesen (NAY-sun) appeared in one game in each of the past two seasons for the Ducks, who acquired him from Ottawa in 2013.

The 2011 first-round pick by the Senators has spent most of the past three seasons in the AHL with Anaheim’s affiliates in Norfolk and San Diego. He scored 32 points in 65 games for the Gulls last season.

The 23-year-old Texas native’s pro career has been hindered by two major injuries. He missed practically all of the 2013-14 season with torn ligaments in his left knee, and he missed four months of the 2014-15 season after an opponent’s skate blade nearly severed his right Achilles tendon.

Twitter unveils plan to stream NHL games

LONDON, ENGLAND - NOVEMBER 07:  In this photo illustration, The Twitter logo is displayed on a mobile device as the company announced it's initial public offering and debut on the New York Stock Exchange on November 7, 2013 in London, England. Twitter went public on the NYSE opening at USD 26 per share, valuing the company's worth at an estimated USD 18 billion.  (Photo by Bethany Clarke/Getty Images)
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SAN FRANCISCO (AP) Twitter will live stream for free one Major League Baseball game and one NHL game per week under a new deal.

The agreement announced Monday will allow viewers to watch games nationally that would normally be available only in the two teams’ home markets. Users will not need to be logged into Twitter to see the games.

The baseball games will also be available outside the U.S., with some exceptions. Twitter did not announce the game schedule Monday.

The social media network is attempting to move into live sports streaming through “over-the-top” broadcasts, which do not require a cable subscription. In April, Twitter reached a deal with the NFL to stream 10 “Thursday Night Football” games this fall.