Maybe Gary Bettman should let someone else hand out the Cup …


bettmancup.jpgEvery year – but especially when a road team wins – the Stanley Cup handout ceremony is a hilariously awkward moment. For the winning team’s captain, it’s the height of exhilaration, whether that player is a fresh-faced (but wacky side-burned) youngster such as Jonathan Toews or a gray-bearded veteran like Ray Bourque. Yet, every time, you know that Gary Bettman will be there … and there will also be a merciless onslaught of boos.

Apparently, I’m not the only person who feels this way, but I feel like the league should consider having someone who isn’t such a polarizing figure hand out the Cup. Here’s a take from Adam Proteau of the Hockey News.

I’ve been a fervent advocate for a new presentation plan for the past few years not just because Bettman is a mortal lock to be booed – like a Wall St. financial regulator – each and every time he awards the Cup.

Indeed, Bettman’s predecessors were jeered to high heaven when they had the job. And unless the league wises up and makes Hello Kitty its representative of team owners, Bettman’s eventual replacement will be sonically abused with an equal amount (OK, maybe not an equal amount) of gusto.

However, when you consider other options that exist for handing over the Cup – having the captain of the Cup-winning team from the previous season do it, or giving the task to an NHL Hall of Famer – the current routine can only be seen as a ponderous paean to a power broker’s ego.

Just picture this alternative:

You’re a long-time Chicago Blackhawks die-hard. Perhaps you’re old enough to remember the highs and lows your team experienced since the last time they won a Cup in 1961. Well, Patrick Kane scores that odd game-winning goal and after the chaos dies down ever so slightly … Stan Mikita and Bobby Hull walk out with the Cup to congratulate Jonathan Toews.

(The mere concept of Mario Lemieux handing the Cup to Sidney Crosby would have caused my brain to short circuit last year.)

Over the years, I’ve slowly come to realize that Bettman is often a scapegoat for problems that would probably exist with a different commissioner. He has his flaws, for sure, but his Darth Vader reputation is at least a bit unfair.

Still, there’s no doubt that hockey fans have an almost Pavlovian urge to boo when they see Bettman, So why slightly tarnish a ceremony in which the most gorgeous trophy in professional sports is handed out? Bettman can still speak on behalf of the league in big interviews and important moments, but maybe he should step aside during a moment of such unbridled fan passion.

It probably won’t ever change, but it sure would make things a little more comfortable for … everyone involved, really.

Kings grab goalie insurance by signing Budaj

LOS ANGELES, CA - SEPTEMBER 22: Jhonas Enroth #1 and Peter Budaj #31 of the Los Angeles Kings stretch before a game against the Arizona Coyotes at STAPLES Center on September 22, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Andrew D. Bernstein/NHLI via Getty Images)
via Los Angeles Kings
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In slightly less interesting Los Angeles Kings news than the latest in the Mike Richards fiasco, the team handed Peter Budaj a one-year, two-way deal on Friday.

The veteran goalie’s contract pays $575K on the NHL level and $100K in the AHL (though it’s $150K guaranteed), according to Hockey’s Cap.

At the moment, it sounds like Budaj will be third on the Kings’ goalie depth chart. That says as much about how things have been going lately for Los Angeles than Budaj’s work on a PTO.

As noted above, one of the more significant moves in Budaj’s favor came when the New York Islanders claimed Jean-Francois Berube off of waivers this week.

The Kings actually waived Budaj before signing him, so this has to be a relief to a goalie with a fairly robust resume as a backup.

All apologies to Budaj, but it’s probably true that the Kings would prefer not to see him at the NHL level very often in 2015-16.

Kings, NHLPA announce settlement in Richards grievance

Los Angeles Kings v New York Rangers

The Los Angeles Kings announced today that they have “reached an agreement with Mike Richards to resolve the grievance filed in relation to the termination of his NHL Standard Players Contract. The terms are agreeable to all parties.”

The club said that it will not be commenting further “on the terms” of the settlement.

The NHLPA released a similar statement.

It was reported earlier in the week that a settlement was close to being reached; however, it wasn’t clear what salary-cap penalties the Kings would incur.

We’re starting to find out some details now:

How the final numbers differ from what the Kings would have incurred if they’d bought Richards out will be interesting to see. And if there are differences, how will they be justified?

Stay tuned.