It's official: New Jersey Devils move AHL afilliate back to Albany

With the Albany River Rats leaving for Charlotte, NC, the New Jersey Devils have formally been approved to move their AHL affiliate, the Lowell Devils, to Albany for the 2010-2011 season. The River Rats had been the Devils affiliate in the AHL from 1993 to 2006, before New Jersey decided to switch the affiliation over to the Lowell Lock Monsters in 2006.

It wasn’t exactly the friendliest departure either, as relations between the fans and the team had soured in the latter stages of the Devils’ affiliation with the River Rats.

Yet with the River Rats headed to Charlotte, and the lease with the arena expiring in Lowell, the Devils felt it was time to give it another shot in an area that should be a great town for minor league hockey. This new team will be called the Albany Devils, completely with a wholly generic AHL logo. Here’s the press release:

SPRINGFIELD, Mass. … American Hockey League President and CEO
Andrews announced today that the league’s Board of Governors has
approved the relocation of the franchise owned by the New Jersey Devils
from Lowell, Mass., to Albany, N.Y., to begin play there this fall.

The Albany Devils will mark the return of New Jersey’s affiliate to New
York’s capital region and the Times Union Center. The Devils were the
parent club of the AHL’s Albany River Rats for 13 years from 1993-2006,
winning four division championships and the Calder Cup in 1995, the
same season the New Jersey Devils won their first Stanley Cup.

The River Rats played a total of 17 seasons in Albany before they were
sold and relocated to Charlotte, N.C., to begin there in 2010-11.

In operation since 1936, the AHL continues to serve as the top
development league for all 30 National Hockey League teams. More than 85
percent of today’s NHL players are American Hockey League graduates,
and for the ninth year in a row, more than 6 million fans have attended
AHL games across North America during the 2009-10 season. The 2010
Calder Cup Finals are underway, with the Hershey Bears and the Texas
Stars tied at two wins apiece in their battle for the AHL’s 74th
championship. Game 5 is Friday night.

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    Lucic: If I wanted to hurt Couture, ‘I would have hurt him’


    Last night in Los Angeles, Kings forward Milan Lucic received a match penalty after skating the entire width of the ice to give San Jose’s Logan Couture a two-hand shove to the face.

    Lucic didn’t hurt Couture, who had caught Lucic with an open-ice hit that Lucic didn’t like. Couture’s smiling, mocking face was good evidence that the Sharks’ forward was going to be OK.

    This morning, Lucic was still in disbelief that he was penalized so harshly.

    “I didn’t cross any line,” Lucic said, per Rich Hammond of the O.C. Register. “Believe me, if my intentions were to hurt him, I would have hurt him.”

    While Lucic knew he deserved a penalty, he said after the game that he didn’t “know why it was called a match penalty.” His coach, Darryl Sutter, agreed, calling it “a borderline even roughing penalty.”

    And though former NHL referee Kerry Fraser believes a match penalty was indeed warranted, Lucic said this morning that he hasn’t heard from the NHL about any possible supplemental discipline.

    Nor for that matter has Dustin Brown, after his high hit on Couture in the first period.

    In conclusion, it’s good to have hockey back.

    Related: Sutter says Kings weren’t ‘interested’ in checking the Sharks

    Torres apologizes to Silfverberg and Sharks


    A statement from Raffi Torres:

    “I accept the 41-game suspension handed down to me by the NHL’s Department of Player Safety. I worked extremely hard over the last two years following reconstructive knee surgery to resume my NHL career, and this is the last thing I wanted to happen. I am disappointed I have put myself in a position to be suspended again. I sincerely apologize to Jakob for the hit that led to this suspension, and I’m extremely thankful that he wasn’t seriously injured as a result of the play. I also want to apologize to my Sharks teammates and the organization.”

    A statement from San Jose GM Doug Wilson:

    “The Sharks organization fully supports the NHL’s supplementary discipline decision regarding Raffi. While we do not believe there was any malicious intent, this type of hit is unacceptable and has no place in our game. There is a difference between playing hard and crossing the line and there is no doubt, in this instance, Raffi crossed that line. We’re very thankful that Jakob was not seriously injured as a result of this play.”

    Silfverberg says he expects to play Saturday when the Ducks open their regular season Saturday in San Jose.