2010 Stanley Cup Finals: Michael Leighton was expecting a pass


Leighton5.jpgI am admittedly hard on goaltenders, especially NHL goaltenders in
the playoffs.

Many people wondered what Dan Boyle was doing when
he threw his own puck on net; me, I was all over Evgeni Nabokov for not
being square to the play.

Before the Cup finals began everyone was
all gaga over Michael Leighton and how great he was against the Bruins
and the Canadiens. While he was certainly better than expected, he’d yet
to play a team like Chicago when the pressure was at its highest.

the Hawks, through six games, Leighton was good. At times he was great,
but for a team like the Flyers to pull off the upset against Chicago
they needed him to be incredible. In their biggest game of the season,
he was far from incredible.

It’s tough to blame the go-ahead goal
in the third period on Leighton — it was tipped in front — but his
positioning on that play was indicative of the problems with his game
all series. The real killer was the goal before, after the Flyers had
taken a stunning 2-1 lead after being grossly outshot. Patrick Sharp has
a good shot, but this wasn’t his best. It was a clean release, and
Leighton had a clear sight of the shot; somehow the puck found it’s way
through him from the short side.

It’s something that had happened
to Leighton all series long. Good saves, followed by a soft short side

I’m still trying to figure out what happen on Patrick Kane’s
shot. As a goaltender, you are taught to always stay square to the
puck. If the puck is along the boards, you hug your post and make your
leg pads into a wall. The first instinct is to anticipate a shot, but
your first responsibility is to the initial shot. Trust your defensemen
to cover that pass if it gets through. Unfortunately,
Leighton broke that rule. Per Chris Botta:

walked out of the corner and there was a guy driving to the
net,” said Leighton, who stopped 37 of 41 shots over 64 minutes and six
seconds. “I thought Kane was going to pass it. He threw it at my feet
and it went underneath me.”

From that angle, Kane’s
goal should never have gone in. While you feel happy for the Blackhawks,
I am saddened that a Stanley Cup was won on such a soft goal like that

Avs unveil new third jerseys

Avs Jerseys

The Avalanche will be throwing a bunch of different looks at us this season.

Having already released specialized “Mile High” jerseys for February’s Stadium Series game, the Avs unveiled new third sweaters on Friday — less than 24 hours after a bitter 5-4 home loss to Minnesota in their season opener.

(Guess Colorado wanted to send out some good vibes after blowing a 4-1 third-period lead.)

While undoubtedly exciting for the organization, the release of these new thirds isn’t taking anybody by surprise. Last month, several websites published leaked images of Colorado’s and Anaheim’s third jerseys, so the design has been in the public eye for several weeks.

The Avs will debut these new thirds on Oct. 24, in a Saturday night tilt against Columbus.

Related: Roy explains why he didn’t call time out

Report: Escrow set at 16 percent

Gary Bettman, Donald Fehr
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Hey, remember in June when the NHLPA voted to keep the five-percent growth factor in spite of increasing worries about escrow?

Well, here’s why that decision was a significant one, via TSN’s Frank Seravalli:

With early revenue projections in place, the NHL and NHLPA set the escrow withholding rate for players at 16 per cent for the first quarter of the season on Thursday.

That means every player will have 16 per cent of earnings deducted from their paycheque and put aside until after all of this season’s hockey-related revenue is counted to ensure a perfect 50-50 revenue split with owners.

Now, this doesn’t mean that the players will definitely lose 16 percent of their salaries. Typically, they receive refunds when all the accounting is done.

Still, 16 percent is a good-sized chunk to withhold. They won’t be thrilled about it.

Related: To understand escrow, consider Duncan Keith