2010 Stanley Cup Finals, Game 3: Giroux perfect example of Flyers' resiliency

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Giroux.jpgIf we didn’t know it before, then we sure as heck know it now: the
Philadelphia Flyers are one of the most the resilient teams we’ve ever
seen in the postseason. At the heart of this team is a group of
determined forwards, who may not be the biggest stars in the NHL and
certainly don’t get as much attention as Jeff Carter, Dan Carcillo or
Mike Richards, but who are more important to the Flyers’ success than
any other.

Claude Giroux, Danny Briere and Ville Leino have lifted this team up
and placed them squarely on their own backs. In every deep postseason
run you need role players to step up and play the best hockey of their
lives, but I don’t think anyone anticipated the level these three have
reached.

They don’t play together, at least not all of the time, but these
three have been the difference in the postseason for the Flyers. Giroux,
who scored just 16 goals in 82 regular season games, now has 8 goals
and 17 points in the playoffs. He’s scored big goal after big goal, and
none has ever been bigger than his tipped goal that came 5:59 into the
first overtime.

With that tip, coming off a great play by Matt Carle at the point and
perfect anticipation by Giroux, the Flyers avoided a 3-0 hole in the
series and made things very interesting heading into Game 4.

“It’s huge. I don’t think guys want to do a comeback again from
3-0.” Giroux said. “So it was tough losing the first two games. If we
want to give us a chance to win the Series, we need to win this game
tonight. The message was pretty clear before the game, and guys showed
up.”

Giroux played some inspiring hockey against the Bruins and the
Canadiens, but had disappeared a bit in the first two games of the
series. There was no doubt that if the Flyers would pull off a comeback,
they’d need better play from the players a bit farther down the depth
chart. Giroux says that’s something he and his teammates were focused on
after the two games in Chicago.

“Anytime you’re not producing or playing well, you are just going to
keep it simple and go back just working hard. I think we did that, and
we tried to win as many battles as we could.”

Coach Laviolette says that Giroux was perhaps pressing too much,
playing too tight as he played in his first Stanley Cup finals. With the
series now back at home, the Flyers focused on just playing their game
in front of their home crowd, something that seemed to help Giroux in
the end.

“We talked about just having some fun tonight, come out and letting
everything roll,” Laviolette said after the game. “Go after him, and I
think he took that advice, because he was smiling all day. He came to
the rink and went out and played a great game. Sometimes you need to
loosen up a little bit. He’s a talented kid.”

Giroux, Briere and Leino all made tremendous plays tonight, but for
them it was just the same thing they’ve done all postseason long. None
of the players seemed overly excited about the win or their plays,
instead wanting to immediately focus on Game 4 and evening up the
series.

Leino in particular has come to life for the Flyers, and is perhaps
the biggest surprise of the playoffs. After the game he was soft spoken
and humble, saying that the Flyers “know exactly what we have to do” and
that for them this is just business as usual.

All postseason long the Flyers have found ways to overcome adversity
of any and every sort, but it’s something the Flyers have become
accustomed to. Laviolette believes that his team is at it’s best when
their backs are against the the wall.

“It’s been for a long time. Like I said this morning, 2-0 for us is
comfortable. We’re okay with that. We know how to battle through it.
We knew how important the game was tonight. Once we wake up
tomorrow morning, we know we have to hold serve on home ice. I think
the guys will be fine with that.”

This morning, the Flyers were one hell of a confident bunch and it
seemed as if they reveled in the fact they were facing a must-win
situation. They were calm and business like, yet loose and never acted
like a team that was down two games in the Stanley Cup finals. Yet no
matter what the circumstances, no matter how matter of fact the Flyers
are about this win, there’s no doubting how big that goal was for Claude
Giroux. This is one he’s going to remember for a long time, yet he’s
still focused on the task at hand.

“It’s obviously a big goal. It’s probably my biggest goal in my
career,” he said with a grin.

“I’m happy I was able to do that. As quick as we can put this
game behind us and be ready for game 4, it’s going to be huge. There’s a
lot of emotion tonight. But I think it’s important that we just focus
and be ready for game 4.”

IOC resistant to NHL’s demand to be treated like Olympic sponsor

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In order for the NHL to keep sending its players to the Olympics, Gary Bettman wants the IOC to treat his league more like an Olympic sponsor gets treated.

“We don’t even get the opportunity to promote the fact that we’re at the Olympics,” Bettman lamented earlier this month. “We don’t get to use the rings. I’ve said to the IOC, you know, Coca-Cola is a sponsor, they get to promote their association and say ‘proud sponsor of the Olympics.’ They won’t let us do that.”

It’s not a wholly unfair request by the commissioner. The NHL has to disrupt its season to send players to the Games, and the owners have to risk the health of their stars.

That said, it doesn’t sound like the IOC is going to budge.

“Obviously, this time the owners of the NHL clubs are putting more commercial conditions to the IOC and the Olympic movement,” IOC spokesman Mark Adams told Reuters.

“The IOC knows that the NHL understands that the Olympic movement cannot treat the owners of a commercial franchise of a national league better than an international sports federation or other professional leagues with regard to the Olympic Games.”

Translation: The IOC isn’t about to open a can of worms. (See: Mark Cuban, NBA participation)

Recently, NHLPA chief Donald Fehr summed up the NHL’s desire to get compensated for Olympic participation.

“Based on the proposals to us and the suggestions to the IOC, they don’t care who pays them,” Fehr told Postmedia. “They just want somebody to.”

And according to Fehr, it won’t be the players who pay the NHL.

So if the players aren’t going to give the NHL anything, and the IOC isn’t going to give the NHL anything, well, you see the problem.

Bylsma calls Reinhart’s rule violation, subsequent benching ‘disappointing’

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There was a strange sight during Buffalo’s 3-1 loss to Columbus on Tuesday night: Sabres forward Sam Reinhart, fully dressed, sitting on the end of the bench.

And not moving.

At all.

Reinhart was parked for the entire 60 minutes last night, which the Sabres later revealed to be punishment for violating team policy. According to a Buffalo News source, the 21-year-old showed up late to a meeting in the team hotel.

Suffice to say, Sabres head coach Dan Bylsma wasn’t happy with the situation, or the outcome.

“We’re going to move forward from here,” Bylsma said. “Disappointing, but it happened and we dealt with it. We’re going to move on from here.

“We’re part of a team. We do things as a team. That’s hopefully the lesson.”

This isn’t the first time Reinhart’s run afoul of Bylsma this season.

In late October — and with Reinhart failing to find the back of the net — Bylsma said the club needed to get more out of the sophomore forward, who had 23 goals and 42 points as a rookie last season.

That said, Reinhart has exceeded his point total from last year, currently on 46, and has been a steady lineup presence (well, aside from last night). He’s one of just a handful of Sabres to appear in 70-plus games this season, and saw his TOI jump up to 17:15 per night.

NHL on NBCSN: Injury-riddled Pens look to snap three-game skid against slumping Blackhawks

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NBCSN will continue its coverage of the 2016-17 campaign tonight when the Pittsburgh Penguins host the Chicago Blackhawks at 8:00 p.m. ET. If you want to watch the game online, you can do so here.

Since the All-Star break, the Blackhawks have been one of the better teams in the NHL. Their terrific run over the last few weeks has not only allowed them to jump ahead of Minnesota for top spot in the Central, but it’s also enabled them to build a seven-point lead over their division rival.

But it’s not all perfect in Chicago right now. Despite the fact that they’re in a good spot in the standings, the ‘Hawks had a rough ride through Florida in the last few days.

On Saturday night, they were thumped 7-0 by the Panthers, and on Monday, they blew a 4-1 lead to the Tampa Bay Lightning before losing in overtime.

Their effort may have been better on Monday than it was on Saturday, but it still wasn’t enough to propel them to victory.

“I thought we were 100 percent better than we were last game,” head coach Joel Quenneville said after the loss to the Bolts, per the Chicago Tribune. “I know we had everything going our way there and we started getting cute in the neutral zone and had turnovers in that area, gave them rush chances.”

The performances in their last two games led defenseman Niklas Hjalmarsson to suggest that his team was “too comfortable” this late into the season.

The ‘Hawks have dropped three of their last four games (their only win came in a shootout victory over Dallas).

Now, they’ll have an opportunity to get back on track against the defending Stanley Cup champions.

The Penguins are having issues of their own, and it’s mostly injury-related.

Pittsburgh has been without Evgeni Malkin, Carl Hagelin, Jake Guentzel, Kris Letang, Trevor Daley, Olli Maatta and Ron Hainsey, and it’s clearly affected their play.

There’s a bit of good news on the injury front. Conor Sheary, who suffered a lower-body injury on Sunday, is expected to play tonight.

Malkin was able to skate on his own on Tuesday, and head coach Mike Sullivan hopes to get him back soon.

“Our medical staff has a good handle on it,” Sullivan said, per the Pittsburgh Tribune. “He’s going through a process both on and off the ice. He skated this morning, and he’s making progress, so we’re encouraged and we’re hopeful we’ll get him back sooner than later.”

Coming into tonight’s game, the Penguins have dropped three in a row to the Senators (shootout), Islanders (shootout) and Flyers.

The Pens aren’t in any danger of missing the playoffs, but they’re still battling for home-ice advantage in the opening round of the playoffs.

Columbus’ win over Buffalo pushed them two points ahead of the Penguins (both have played 75 games). The Jackets also have four more regulation/overtime wins.

The Capitals, who beat Minnesota last night, are three points up on Columbus and five points up on Pittsburgh.

PHT Morning Skate: Joel Armia scored an amazing shorthanded goal you’ll have to see to believe

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Joel Armia has developed into a very useful player for the Winnipeg Jets, and on Tuesday night, he scored an incredible end-to-end goal that you won’t want to miss. He fought off one New Jersey Devil then got around two others before scoring this beautiful shorthanded goal. (Top)

–The Score breaks down the best “bang for your buck” contracts on each Canadian team. It’s not shocking to see Senators goalie Mike Condon on this list. The second-year netminder has been with three teams this season, but he’s come through in a big way for the Senators, and he only makes $575,000. (The Score)

–The ESPN Hockey writers put together a list of what they think the Vegas Golden Knights roster is going to look like after the expansion draft. Some well-known names like Andrew Cogliano, Jonas Brodin, Mikkel Boedker, Tomas Plekanec, Jonathan Marchessault, Carl Hagelin and Jakob Silfverberg all made the list. (ESPN)

–Elliotte Friedman’s “30 Thoughts” blog touched on some advice David Poile had for the Golden Knights now that the Oakland Raiders will be moving to Vegas. “You have to do your own thing. We created our ‘Predator Way.’ The Smashville idea and name. In-game entertainment fitting the market. Those things worked.” Friedman also wrote about Ken Hitchcock possibly returning to Dallas, and much more. (Sportsnet)

–Brampton Thunder forward Laura Stacey is the great-granddaughter of hall-of-fame defenseman King Clancy. Recently, Stacey decided she wanted to do a little digging into her great-grandfather’s career, and it really allowed her to get an appreciation for everything he accomplished. “Now I understand how hard he worked, how passionate and determined he was to be the best. Yes, it was a different era, but I can only imagine how hard he had to work to get where he was. As I get older, it makes it more special in that I know more the kind of guy he was.” (Canadian Press)

–The Montreal Canadiens have had some incredible defensemen come through their organization, but last night, Andrei Markov was able to reach an impressive milestone. By picking up an assist in a 4-1 win over Dallas, he tied Guy Lapointe for second in points by a defenseman in franchise history. Larry Robinson’s mark is pretty safe.