2010 Stanley Cup Finals, Game 3: Does Pronger get away with too much?


Chris Pronger does not have a great reputation. He’s been suspended
multiple times in the past, and not always for just a bad hit — the
leg-stomping incident is about as bad as you can get.

That he ended up playing for the Flyers is only fitting. He was
brought in to provide not only great defensive leadership and veteran
experience, but to be that nasty guy out on the ice that no one wants to
mess with. The Flyers are a physical team for sure, but every team
needs a player that is — sort of — like Pronger.

A lot of the focus headed into this series has been on his matchup
against Dustin Byfuglien. After two games and a complete shutdown of the
Blackhawks’ top line, the focus has now shifted to what I think is one
of the oddest and dumbest incidents to debate over I’ve seen in a long

Chris Pronger stole the puck at the end of both games.

Oh my.

This has caused an incredible amount of debate to spill out across
the interweb, with many saying this is justification that Pronger is
nothing more than a jerk. Perhaps he’s a genius. It seems that everyone
is talking about Pronger and this puck incident instead of focusing on
what really matters.

Today, several of the Blackhawks were asked about Pronger. Other than
the postgame festivities after Game 2, he’s been relatively quiet. He’s
played solid and smart hockey, not allowing himself to get caught up in
any games with the rest of the Blackhawks.

Instead, it’s the Blackhawks that are now caught up in his game.
Patrick Kane was asked if perhaps Pronger gets away with more because oh
who he is.

“I think so. I think the refs probably know it too,” Kane said. “He’s
been in the league a long time. He gets away with whacks here and
there that he probably shouldn’t. Playing in the league that long, I
guess you kind of deserve something like that.”

Coach Joel Quenneville isn’t all that worried about it, and says that
Pronger is smart for being able to play like he does without taking too
many penalties.

“You have to commend Prongs for finding ways to get around it or
push the envelope, whichever — as far as, I guess, you can push it.
But he’s a smart player that is effective in a lot of ways. He finds
the way to take advantage of whatever situation it is that can give him
an edge.”

Perhaps Pronger went a bit too far in taking those
pucks, but it’s created drama for the Blackhawks while he’s easily
shrugged off any question directed his way about it. The Flyers didn’t
have much to say about it today and frankly weren’t asked all that much
about the incident.

I’m certain that Adam Burish will have
something to say though, and while he’s done plenty of talking off the
ice I’m certain he might have something to say tonight as well.

PHT Morning Skate: Remembering 10 years of Crosby, Ovechkin

Sidney Crosby, Alex Ovechkin
AP Photo
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PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

Here’s a detailed look back at Sidney Crosby and Alex Ovechkin‘s first 10 years in the NHL. (NHL.com)

Speaking of Crosby, he’s signed a multiyear partnership with adidas. (Newswire)

Ryan Nugent-Hopkins will play a key role in easing Connor McDavid into the NHL. (Edmonton Sun)

After two polar opposite seasons, the jury is still out on Patrick Roy as a head coach. (Denver Post)

Marc-Andre Fleury enjoys pulling off pranks on his teammates. “I play better when I’m looser, laughing and having fun,” he said. (Pittsburgh Tribune-Review)

Art McDonald, a Canadian who won recently won a Nobel Prize, talked to the committee members about the Toronto Maple Leafs. (SB Nation)

DiMaio named Blues’ director of player personnel

via St. Louis Blues
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The St. Louis Blues named Rob DiMaio their director of player personnel on Tuesday.

He’s been with the organization for some time. He joined as a pro scout in 2008 and was the pro scouting director starting in August 2012.

He was also a scout for the Dallas Stars before landing with the Blues (one would assume his biggest connection is GM Doug Armstrong, then).

In case his nose didn’t give it away, he also enjoyed a lengthy hockey career over 19 seasons.

No doubt about it, this is a pivotal season for the Blues after multiple campaigns in which strong regular seasons dissolved into playoff disappointments. Perhaps DiMaio can make a difference in a heightened role?