2010 Stanley Cup finals: Supporting cast helps Chicago win weird Game 1, 6-5


kopeckyandhossa.jpgHockey writers might need to dust off a thesaurus or two to describe this one. What’s the correct variation of “strange” to describe this one? Should people refer to it as bewildering? Bizarre? Maybe a car wreck? All of those labels apply, but I think I’ll go with Brandon’s “sloppy” or maybe up the ante to flat-out “inept.”

Whatever way you slice it, though, the Chicago Blackhawks managed to eke out a 6-5 win that should leave the Philadelphia Flyers kicking themselves tonight.

Chicago Blackhawks 6, Philadelphia Flyers 5

Blackhawks lead series 1-0

Perhaps the Game 1 clincher was a microcosm of the game itself. Tomas Kopecky was considered more or less a throw-in when the Chicago Blackhawks signed Marian Hossa this summer; some wondered if the team acquired him simply to give Hossa a friend to talk to. He performed that way at times, too; after all, the reason he played (after being a healthy scratch for five straight playoff games) was because Andrew Ladd couldn’t suit up thanks to an injury. 

Kopecky’s game winner was a buffet of everything right and wrong with this game. While the tally earned high marks for entertainment value, it came on the back of leaky defense on the part of the Flyers and a poor bit of positioning by relief goalie Brian Boucher. Here’s video of the goal, for your own perusal.

Neither team should be particularly proud – or, really – distinctly worried. The Flyers came out booming to the surprise of many, out-shooting the Blackhawks 17-9 for a stunning 3-2 lead in the opening frame. They dominated the Blackhawks in the faceoff circle (40 to 24) tonight and managed to score one PP goal in four chances while staying out of the box completely.

That’s right: the Flyers – a franchise once known for the sort of brutality that can occasionally give the sport a PR black eye – went a full game without sitting in the penalty box. I’d say that Dave Schultz is rolling in his grave right now, but “The Hammer” is still alive.

Down 0-1, the Flyers face plenty of questions. Is there a brewing goalie controversy after the team (justifiably, in my eyes) pulled struggling starter Michael Leighton? What happened to their stars who were held pointless in this contest? (Carter: -2, Richards: -2, Giroux -2 and Gagne -3. Yikes.) Was tonight a confidence booster or a missed opportunity?

The most troubling factor for Philadelphia – but also quite a sobering thought for Chicago – is that the Blackhawks big guns failed to show up, too. Dustin Byfuglien (0 pts, -3) was “out-buffed” by Brillo-headed goof ball Scott Hartnell, who provided a great net presence along with one goal and two assists. Patrick Kane and Jonathan Toews were worse than invisible, as they took away from the table with matching -3 ratings. It’s fantastic that the ludicrously deep Blackhawks won without their stars contributing, but how often can they expect two goals from Troy Brouwer?

On some level, the Flyers can take a little confidence away from this game as even amid all the chaos, their forecheck flustered a nervous Chicago team into a near-loss. I cannot help but wonder if this game will be the best chance Philly has, though, as the Hawks out-shot the Flyers 23-15 in the final two frames. Chicago played its best hockey in the third period, when even the beleaguered Antti Niemi made some huge saves when it really mattered. Games like this might not make Niemi a legend … they just might make him a champion.

It wasn’t pretty hockey, really, but it sure was intriguing. One thing’s clear: it will be hard to top Game 1, at least when it comes to absurdity.

Kings GM says Mike Richards went into ‘a destructive spiral’

Mike Richards

The Los Angeles Kings may owe Mike Richards money until 2031 (seriously), but in settling his grievance, the team and player more or less get to turn the page.

Not before Kings GM Dean Lombardi shares his sometimes startling perspective, though.

Lombardi has a tendency to be candid, especially in the press release-heavy world of sports management. Even by his standards, his account of Richards’ “destructive sprial” is a staggering read from the Los Angeles Times’ Lisa Dillman.

“Without a doubt, the realization of what happened to Mike Richards is the most traumatic episode of my career,” Lombardi said in a written summation he provided to the Los Angeles Times. “At times, I think that I will never recover from it. It is difficult to trust anyone right now – and you begin to question whether you can trust your own judgment. The only thing I can think of that would be worse would be suspecting your wife of cheating on you for five years and then finding out in fact it was true.”

Lombardi provides plenty of eyebrow-raising statements to Dillman, including:

  • He believed he “found his own Derek Jeter” in Richards, a player who “at one time symbolized everything that was special about the sport.”
  • Lombardi remarked that “his production dropped 50 percent and the certain ‘it’ factor he had was vaporizing in front of me daily.”
  • The Kings GM believes that he was “played” by Richards.

… Yeah.

Again, it’s a powerful read that you should soak in yourself, even if you’re unhappy with the way the Kings handled the situation.

Maybe the most pressing of many lingering questions is: will we get to hear Richards’ side of the story?

Coyotes exploit another lousy outing from Quick

Jonathan Quick

Despite owning two Stanley Cup rings, there are a healthy number of people who aren’t wild about Jonathan Quick.

Those people might feel validated through the Los Angeles Kings’ first two games, as he followed a rough loss to the San Jose Sharks with a true stinker against the Arizona Coyotes on Friday.

Sometimes a goalie has a bad night stats-wise, yet his team is as much to blame as anything else. You can probably pin this one on Quick, who allowed four goals on just 14 shots through the first two periods.

Things died down in the final frame, but let’s face it; slowing things down is absolutely the Coyotes’ design with a 4-1 lead (which ultimately resulted in a 4-1 win).


A soft 1-0 goal turned out to be a sign of things to come:

Many expected the Kings to roar into this second game after laying an egg in their opener. Instead, the Coyotes exploited Quick’s struggles for a confidence-booster, which included key prospect Max Domi scoring a goal and an assist.

It’s worth mentioning that Mike Smith looked downright fantastic at times, only drawing more attention to Quick’s struggles.


After a troubled summer and a failed 2014-15 season, Los Angeles was likely eager to start things off the right way.

Instead, they instead will likely focus on the fact that they merely dropped two (ugly) games.