Texas Stars have better attendance than Hamilton Bulldogs

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Last season, the Dallas Stars operated without an AHL affiliate while
waiting a year for their new, local affiliate to get up and running.
The Texas Stars, based out of Austin, kicked off their inaugural season
in September, 2009 and instantly became a hit with the locals.

What’s
that? Yes, you read that right; AHL hockey was a success in Austin,
Texas.

It’s not exactly your traditional hockey crowd (there’s
just as many Texas Longhorns hats as there are Stars hats) but the fans
that do come to the game are enthusiastic, loud and knowledgeable about
the game of hockey.

One reason the team has been so successful in
just their first season has been their success on the ice; the Stars
have been at or near the top of their division all season long. Yet the
Stars also had an extremely high number of preseason ticket sales.
showing that the sport of hockey is viable in such a ‘non-traditional’
locale as Austin, Texas.

With the Stars facing the Hamilton
Bulldogs this past week in the AHL conference finals, we’ve also been
shown that perhaps all the talk about Canada needing another hockey team
is perhaps a bit premature.

With Jim Balsillie hoping to buy the
Phoenix Coyotes and move them to Hamilton, Ontario last summer, the
internet erupted in arguments on how a town like Hamilton ‘deserved’ a
NHL team more than Phoenix and would certainly be a better financial
option. Despite another NHL team being in the area, we were assured that
fans in the area would flock to see an NHL team.

Yet why is it
that a hockey team in Austin, Texas is turning out more fans per game
than one in Hamilton? From Defending Big D:

Though eight home playoff games each, Stars fans have filled the
Cedar Park Center with an average attendance of 4,873 people per game –
that number of course really helped by this past weekend’s attendance at
all three games: 4,535 for game three on Wednesday and then 6,215 for
Friday night’s game four and 5,020 for last night’s game five.

Compare that to the city of Hamilton – or as Jim Basille calls it:
“Southern Ontario” – where in eight playoff games the Bulldogs have only
averaged 3,142 fans.  Games one and two at Copps Coliseum drew 2,977
and 2,897 fans respectively.

On average, the Stars also outdrew the Bulldogs for regular season
games as well.

Hey, maybe hockey fans in the area just aren’t that big on the
Bulldogs and are just biding their time until a NHL team shows up. Then
the fans will show up in droves, providing the economic support for a
team that couldn’t cut it in the ‘south’.

Of course, this argument is a bit moot since their won’t be an NHL
team in Hamilton anytime soon. It’s just an interesting study of hockey
fans in an area that claimed they ‘deserved’ a hockey team more than
another town. This isn’t even an argument about hockey in the south versus Canada. I don’t discourage anybody from having a hockey team. This just goes to show that hockey can be successful anywhere, even in Austin, Texas.

Canucks without Sutter (broken jaw), Edler (foot) for foreseeable future

Brandon Sutter
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After a good Tuesday night, the Vancouver Canucks are having a lousy Wednesday morning.

The club has just announced that center Brandon Sutter and defenseman Alex Edler have been sent home from the club’s current two-game road swing, after suffering injuries in a win over Colorado last night.

Craig Oster, Sutter’s agent, told News 1130 his client has a broken jaw after taking a puck to the face. Per TSN, Edler is undergoing “imaging” on his foot following a blocked shot, but it’s believed he’ll be out the next 2-3 weeks.

The impact of these injuries could be profound.

Vancouver hasn’t been good this year but remains in the thick of the playoff chase, sitting just four points back of the Avs for the final wild card spot in the Western Conference — with three games in hand.

At the same time, the Canucks also have two potentially big trade chips at the deadline in pending UFAs Dan Hamhuis and Radim Vrbata.

Will the Sutter and Edler injuries factor into Vancouver’s future plans?

You’d have to think so.

Edler is a staple on the back end, leading all Canuck blueliners in points (20) and TOI per game (24:27). Sutter, meanwhile, was supposed to be a key piece of the club this year but has had most of his season ravaged by injury — prior to the broken jaw, he missed 33 games following sports hernia surgery.

All told, Sutter has appeared in just 20 games this year.

His is also the second major facial injury suffered by a Canuck this season — Hamhuis only recently returned from a 21-game absence after taking a puck to the face in mid-December.

Kings place Ehrhoff on waivers

LOS ANGELES, CA - DECEMBER 05:  Nick Bonino #13 of the Pittsburgh Penguins and Christian Ehrhoff #10 of the Los Angeles Kings head for the piuck during the first period at Staples Center on December 5, 2015 in Los Angeles, California.  (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
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The Los Angeles Kings have placed defenseman Christian Ehrhoff on waivers, according to TSN’s Bob McKenzie.

A veteran of almost 800 NHL games, Ehrhoff has not fit well with Los Angeles after signing a one-year, $1.5 million deal in August. The 33-year-old has just 11 points in 40 games and is a team-worst minus-10. Though he had two assists in last night’s 9-2 win over the Bruins, he also took a careless tripping penalty in the first period that led to a Boston goal.

In a related story, the Kings are rumored to be looking for help on the back end. In fact, they were reportedly quite interested in Dustin Byfuglien, before he re-signed with the Jets.

According to Jon Rosen of LA Kings Insider, 23-year-old defenseman Kevin Gravel is “on the verge of a recall” from AHL Ontario.

The Kings play Thursday in Brooklyn.

Report: Kadri’s throat-slashing gesture being reviewed by NHL

Nazem Kadri
AP
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Nazem Kadri‘s throat-slashing gesture is under review by the NHL, according to TSN.ca.

The Maple Leafs forward made the gesture while sitting on Toronto’s bench last night in Calgary, moments after he was laid out by Flames captain Mark Giordano.

The NHL first started cracking down on the throat-slashing gesture in 2000. Former NHLer Nick Boyton was suspended twice for making the gesture, first in 2006 then again in 2010. He was banned one game for each incident.

Fix coming? Blues activate Schwartz after 49-game absence

Jaden Schwartz
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After Tuesday’s loss to the Jets — the Blues’ fourth in their last six games — head coach Ken Hitchcock said his club has “got to play harder than this” and “got to compete at a lot higher level than this.”

He then added “it’s up to us to fix it.”

Well, help is on the way.

On Wednesday, the Blues activated forward Jaden Schwartz off injured reserve, after he missed the last 49 contests with a fractured left ankle. Schwartz is expected to be in the lineup on Friday when the Blues take on the Panthers in Florida.

The 23-year-old should provide an immediate boost to the lineup. Schwartz had four points in seven games before getting hurt, and that came on the heels of a successful ’14-15 campaign in which he posted career highs in goals (28) and points (63).

The Blues’ first-round pick in 2010 (14th overall), Schwartz is a 17-18 TOI per night guy, so he’ll be a big presence almost immediately. His return also inches the team back to full health, though there’s still a ways to go — Alex Pietrangelo and Jake Allen are still week-to-week with knee and lower-body injuries, while Steve Ott is out until late February following hamstrings surgery.

Related: Armstrong wants Blues to get healthy before any trades are made