NHL Playoffs, Flyers vs. Canadiens, Game 4: Fun with numbers

gomezfight.jpgWe’ve had some nice coverage of today’s upcoming Flyers-Canadiens tilt. Here’s the game preview and a story about the so-far-huge effect of home ice advantage on the series. To give you a little more information going into the game, I thought I’d throw some math at you.

Some are simple but some are a little more interesting. Let’s have a little fun with numbers. Some of them come from this game preview.

  • So far for the playoffs, the Flyers have 47 goals for and 34 goals against (+13) while the Canadiens have 44 goals for and 50 goals against (-6).
  • The Flyers scored 17 goals on the powerplay while allowing 10 shorthanded (+7) while the Canadiens allowed one more (13) on the kill than they scored with the man advantage (12).
  • Michael Cammalleri leads the playoffs with 13 goals. That’s fourth all-time among Montreal Canadiens players in the playoffs. He’s really good.
  • Like I mentioned in that home ice advantage post, the home team outscored the road team 14-1 in the three games of this series so far.
  • Two years ago, the Flyers also led their best-of-7 series against Montreal, 2-1, before winning Games 4 and 5.
  • Scott Gomez – yes, that Gomez – is the Habs’ penalty minute leader with 25. Philly’s PIM leader is predictably Dan Carcillo (30).
  • Mike Richards hasn’t been far behind Cammalleri, points wise, with 18 to Cammalleri’s 19. Those totals lead their teams, by the way, although Briere is tied with Richards with 18 as well.
  • Jaroslav Halak is still without a shutout, which seems like the only thing the Slovakian goalie can’t accomplish in these playoffs. Meanwhile, Michael Leighton already has 2 SO’s and only played in six games so far.
  • Somehow the rough-and-tumble Flyers and small-but-scrappy Canadiens average the same amount of PIM per game (12).
  • One thing we can be certain of: at least one of these teams won’t be undefeated in games that they can be eliminated. Unless the world ends before they play a hypothetical Game 7 … (not ideal)

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    Being named Oilers captain would be ‘one of the greatest honours,’ says McDavid

    Connor McDavid
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    It began gaining momentum well before Connor McDavid even finished his rookie season, the prospect that the young phenom had what it takes to become captain of the Edmonton Oilers.

    Wayne Gretzky had his say, in an interview with the National Post last season.

    “I have a great deal of respect for him. In my point of view, I think he’s mature enough that he can handle it at any age,” said The Great One, the Oilers captain when that franchise was a dynasty in the 1980s.

    McDavid’s highly anticipated rookie season was interrupted with a shoulder injury, but he returned to play in 45 games, with 48 points. He was named a finalist for the Calder Trophy, and there was plenty of healthy debate for his case to be the top freshman in the league.

    As his season continued and then ended, the talk of McDavid’s possible captaincy in Edmonton has persisted. The Oilers, who traded Taylor Hall last month, didn’t have a captain this past season.

    From Sportsnet’s Mark Spector, in April:

    Connor McDavid will be named as the Oilers’ captain at the age of 19 next fall, one of the items that was deduced at general manager Peter Chiarelli’s season-ending press briefing Sunday. Asked if his team would have a captain next season where this year it did not, the GM responded quickly: “I would think so, that we would have a captain next year.”

    At 19 years and 286 days, Avalanche forward Gabriel Landeskog became the youngest player in NHL history to be named a captain.

    McDavid, the first overall pick in 2015, doesn’t turn 20 years old until Jan. 13 of next year.

    He’s already the face of the Oilers and perhaps soon, the NHL, too. He certainly doesn’t seem to shy away from the potential of one day being named the Oilers captain.

    “Obviously. If I was ever the captain at any point I think it would be one of the greatest honours and one of the accomplishments that I would definitely take the most seriously,” McDavid told the Toronto Sun.

    “I don’t want to comment on it too much, but obviously it would be an unbelievable feeling.”

    Trevor Daley surprises young hockey players, firefighters with Stanley Cup visit

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    Trevor Daley had his day with the Stanley Cup on Saturday, taking it through Toronto, surprising young hockey players at a local rink and firefighters at a local station.

    He also held a private viewing party for family and friends inside a local bar, as per the Toronto Sun.

    Daley’s post-season came to an end in the Eastern Conference Final when he suffered a broken ankle. His absence tested the depth of the Penguins blue line as the playoffs pressed on, but Pittsburgh was ultimately able to power its way to a championship.

    When Sidney Crosby handed off the Stanley Cup, the first player it went to was Daley, whose mother was battling cancer.

    “He had been through some different playoffs, but getting hurt at the time he did, knowing how important it was, he had told me that he went [to see] his mom in between series and stuff, she wasn’t doing well, she wanted to see him with the Cup,” said Crosby, as per Sportsnet.

    “That was important to her. I think that kind of stuck with me after he told me that. We were motivated to get it for him, even though he had to watch.”

    Daley’s mother passed away just over a week later.

    Ben Bishop shows off his new Team USA World Cup mask

    TAMPA, FL - JUNE 06: Ben Bishop #30 of the Tampa Bay Lightning looks on against the Chicago Blackhawks during Game Two of the 2015 NHL Stanley Cup Final at Amalie Arena on June 6, 2015 in Tampa, Florida.  (Photo by Scott Iskowitz/Getty Images)
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    Ben Bishop enjoyed plenty of success during the 2015-16 season and it didn’t go unnoticed. That’s why the veteran was selected to be part of Team USA for this fall’s World Cup of Hockey.

    Team USA is loaded in goal, as they’ll be bringing Bishop, Los Angeles’ Jonathan Quick and New Jersey’s Cory Schneider. It’ll be interesting to see how the coaching staff approaches this situation heading into the tournament.

    Even if Bishop doesn’t start every game for Team USA, he can still say he has a pretty cool goalie mask for the occasion.

    On Saturday, Bishop took to Twitter to show off his new piece of equipment:

    That’s a pretty sweet mask!

    With arbitration hearing looming, Corrado and Leafs aren’t that far apart

    TORONTO, ON - MARCH 5:  Frank Corrado #20 of the Toronto Maple Leafs waits for a puck drop against the Ottawa Senators during an NHL game at the Air Canada Centre on March 5,2016 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The Senators defeated the Maple Leafs 3-2. (Photo by Claus Andersen/Getty Images)
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    Frank Corrado should be used to waiting by now. He had to wait 28 games before the Leafs inserted him into the lineup for the first time last season and now he’s waiting for a new contract.

    There’s still a gap between the two sides, but it doesn’t appear to be very significant. Corrado and the Leafs will head to arbitration on July 26th unless the two sides can agree to a new deal before then.

    According to Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman, The Leafs have two different offers on the table. One is a two-way contract, while the other is a one-way deal that would see him make less money if he sticks in the NHL. Corrado is looking for a one-way deal worth $900,000.

    Toronto scooped Corrado up off waivers from the Canucks prior to the start of the 2015-16 season. Despite waiting a while to actually hit the ice as a Leaf, Corrado finished the season with one goal, six points and a minus-12 rating in 39 games. He averaged 14:27 of ice time.

    Splitting the difference would result in Corrado making roughly $737,500 next season.

    The Maple Leafs are also scheduled to go to arbitration with forward Peter Holland (July 25) and defeseman Martin Marincin (Aug. 2).