Boston Bruins could benefit from keeping Tim Thomas


rasknthomas.jpgWhen asked about waiving his no-trade clause, Boston Bruins goalie Tim Thomas said it was “too early” to make such a decision. While I think that the Boston Bruins would be wise to move the former Vezina Trophy winner at some point in the next couple years, it might actually be too early for them to move him anyway.

Look, there’s no doubt that Thomas didn’t play as well as he did in his star-making 08-09 campaign but he wasn’t necessarily awful. Really, it was more about Tuukka Rask being amazing than anything else. Were there moments in which the unorthodox Thomas seemed to be “exposed”? Maybe so, but a 91.5 percent save percentage is still a bit above the league average. It’s not like he had a disastrous season.

One important thing to remember is that continued success isn’t guaranteed for Rask, either. Even beyond the struggles Thomas had following up a great year, don’t forget that rookie goalies can hit a wall in their sophomore season. Just look at the struggles of Steve Mason; he went from Calder Trophy sensation to a goalie who struggled on an epic level.

More reasons why the Bruins should be cautious about trading Thomas after the jump.

Overall, this scenario reminds me a lot of what Anaheim went through with Jonas Hiller and J.S. Giguere. The older Giguere had his past glories but was eventually usurped by the Swiss goalie Hiller during the 08-09 playoffs. After leading the Ducks to a scrappy second round 7-game defeat against Detroit, Hiller never looked back and claimed the No. 1 spot during this season. Eventually, the Ducks were able to move Giguere to Toronto and locked up the pending free agent Hiller to a franchise goalie contract.

With Rask in the final year of his first contract with Boston, the Bruins might be wise to allow Thomas and Rask to duke it out for the top spot. When you consider the fact that Michael Leighton, Antti Niemi and Jaroslav Halak were backups going into this season, it’s clear that having a good goalie duo is crucial to success in this league.

So, yes, if the Bruins can unload Thomas for a young sniper or salary cap relief, then maybe they should bite the bullet. Still, that’s a dubious assumption to make when the whole league knows that they want to get rid of him. Instead, why not keep Thomas around for at least part of next season in case Rask falters? If nothing else, he could increase his trade value if he regains his elite form.

Bruins list Chara on IR, for now

Zdeno Chara
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Those who feel as though the Boston Bruins may rebound – John Tortorella, maybe? – likely rest some of their optimism on the back of a healthy Zdeno Chara.

It’s possible that he’s merely limping into what may otherwise be a healthy 2015-16 season, but it’s definitely looking like a slow start thanks to a lower-body injury.

The latest sign of a bumpy beginning came on Monday, as several onlookers (including’s Joe Haggerty) pointed out that Chara was listed on injured reserve.

As Haggerty notes, that move is retroactive to Sept. 24, so his status really just opens up options for the Bruins.

Still … it’s a little unsettling, isn’t it?

The Bruins likely realize that they need to transition away from their generational behemoth, but last season provided a stark suggestion that may not be ready yet. Trading Dougie Hamilton and losing Dennis Seidenberg to injury only make them more dependent on the towering 38-year-old.

This isn’t really something to panic about, yet it might leave a few extra seats open on the Bruins’ bandwagon.

Kassian suspended without pay, placed in Stage 2 of Substance Abuse Program

Anaheim Ducks v Vancouver Canucks
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Zack Kassian may have avoided major injuries stemming from his Sunday car accident, but it likely sent the signal that he may need help.

The response: he was placed in Stage Two of the Substance Abuse and Behavioral Health Program (SABH) of the NHL and NHLPA on Monday.

According to the league’s release, Kassian “will be suspended without pay until cleared for on-ice competition by the program administrators.”

Speaking of being suspended without pay, here’s a key detail:

The 24-year-old ended up with a broken nose and broken foot from that accident. The 2015-16 season was set to be his first campaign in the Montreal Canadiens organization after a tumultuous time with the Vancouver Canucks.

Kassian spoke of becoming more mature heading to Montreal, but the Canadiens were critical of his actions, wondering how many wake-up calls someone can get.

In case you’re wondering about the difference between stage one and two: