Explaining the "too many men" penalty


Bruins4.jpgAfter all of the “too many men” penalties we’ve seen in the playoffs,
it was inevitable that one would occur in historic fashion. The Boston
Bruins were trying their best to fight off the Flyers in the third
period of Game 7, having already given up a 3-0 lead and were close to
finishing off a monumental collapse.

Then, the team was caught
with too many men on the ice and the Flyers scored to go-ahead goal on
the ensuing power play. The first thing I thought of was the too many
men the San Jose Sharks weren’t caught with against the Red Wings
(although that was far from a deciding factor), then my next thought was
this had better not be a ticky tack call.

Was it legitimate? A
mix up involving Marc Savard and the bench led to too many men involved
in the play. There were two centers out on the ice, something a number
of the Bruins players noticed immediately.
Chad Finn of the Bruins Blog
passes along these explanations from
the Bruins:

“We had a player [Savard] with his stick
up like he wanted to make a
change, then he changed his mind,” coach Claude Julien explained. “So we
had the next center [Sobotka] jumping on”

“I saw two centermen out there, and I was like, ‘What’s going on?’ “”
Lucic said of the penalty, which happened at the 8:50 mark of the final
period. “Obviously something happened, there was a miscommunication and
we had to get off before we got caught. We got caught.”

According to the Bruins, Savard skated over for a change but didn’t
see anyone coming on so he stayed on the ice. The Bruins weren’t able to
cover up the gaffe quick enough and were caught. It certainly seems as
though a legitimate call was made, especially when this wasn’t just an
instance of a lazy change resulting in too many men actually out on the
ice. This was a mistake by the bench.

Apparently, Mark Recchi and Shawn Thornton didn’t agree with the
call, but when the coach isn’t making a stink about it generally that
means a good call was made.

“Well, I want to play a couple more years in this league so I don’t
want to bad mouth [the officials] too much,” Thornton said. “I do think
. . . I had a pretty good seat for the third period, and I was close to
where the guy was changing and I think it was very, very, very gutsy
call with seven minutes left with all of the other [expletive] that’s
going on out there.”

Of course, this loss can hardly be pinned on the penalty or the
ensuing goal. This loss was about the Bruins failing to keep the
pressure on after grabbing a big, this was about the Bruins once again
lacking the killer instinct needed to win four straight elimination

Personal reasons: No Ovechkin for Caps tonight

Alex Ovechkin
1 Comment

Alex Ovechkin won’t play for the Washington Capitals on Tuesday because of personal reasons, the team confirmed.

He entered the building considerably later than usual, but his presence at least opened the door for the possibility of No. 8 suiting up against the San Jose Sharks.

Instead, the Capitals will face the hot-starting Sharks without Ovechkin (personal reasons) and Nicklas Backstrom (injury).

That’s a tall order, yet it’s also an opportunity for Barry Trotz to prove his system is a difference-maker … and that the Capitals have the young players to take up the mantle when the big stars are out

This is how Washington’s forward lines may look tonight:

No, the Capitals have not shared details regarding what his “personal reasons” might be, by the way.

Bruins put Morrow on IR, bring up Cross

Brady Skjei, Joe Morrow
Leave a comment

Lower-level defense is not the biggest of many worries for the Boston Bruins, yet it might be another in a series of headaches.

CSNNE.com’s Joe Haggerty points out that Joe Morrow has been placed on IR while AHL stalwart Tommy Cross was called up.

With a -3 rating and negligible offensive impact so far, few will really be missing Morrow (pictured). From the way Haggerty describes Cross, it’s a pretty cool story if he gets into the lineup:

Cross was named captain of the Providence Bruins this season, and actually had a strong training camp as the hard-hitting, tough stay-at-home defenseman he’s developed into during his five years in the B’s minor league system. The 2007 second round pick was a highly regarded potential puck-moving defenseman when he was drafted prior to his Boston College career, but a series of knee injuries negated some of his speed and puck-moving capabilities.

Granted, the Bruins would prefer a sure-thing improvement over a feel-good story right now, as this 0-3-0 start marks their worst beginning in some time.

Injuries have been an issue in general, too, with Zdeno Chara‘s slow start mixed with Dennis Seidenberg on the mend and Brad Marchand in limbo.

The Bruins’ next game comes against the Avalanche in Colorado. Maybe they’ll start to mend things on the ice?