Did a lack of character doom the Bruins?


sadbruins2.jpgThe Boston Globe’s Fluto Shinzawa regularly produces great work and his post about Boston’s profound meltdown is a fantastic read. At times it’s a little brutal, but so is reality. Here are some of the most interesting tidbits from his column.

Aside from his overtime winner in Game 1, it was a forgettable series for Savard (1-2–3 in seven games). He was at the center of the too-many-men blunder. He took a lazy hooking penalty in last night’s second period, and although the Bruins killed off the infraction, Danny Briere scored 38 seconds later. In Game 6, Savard high-sticked Kimmo Timonen, a penalty that was followed by Daniel Paille’s elbowing, which ultimately led to Briere’s four-on-three game-winning goal. His backchecking throughout the series was indifferent at best. All those shortcomings point to one major explanation: Savard never had enough time to recapture his game, and for good reason. It took Patrice Bergeron more than a year to get back to where he was before the Grade 3 concussion.

I, for one, must agree with Shinzawa on this point in particular. When it comes to concussions, I’m essentially like a coddling mother who pleads with her child to put on a coat in cold weather. Or, uh, something like that. *cough*

There were stretches in Games 5 and 6 when the Flyers could have stretched their leads to fat cushions if not for some game-saving Rask stops. But to these eyes, it looked like Rask ran out of gas. Can’t blame him for the loss. But maybe the Rask from earlier this season stops one or two of those goals last night. Rask was the biggest reason why the Bruins qualified for the playoffs. But the Bruins needed so much from the rookie that he didn’t have enough juice left at the end.

… There were too many Philly heroes for the Bruins to shut down … The Flyers deserved to win the series.

Those are also salient comments. It would be wrong to heap too much blame on Tuukka Rask. The team really leaned on him despite the fact that he had very little playoff experience. When the series was 3-0 I felt like that deficit was a mirage, considering how close each game was. While I can’t say I saw the reverse-sweep coming, the two teams seemed to be evenly matched.

The Bruins are going to have a lot of soul searching to do, but to be honest, I feel like they overachieved considering all the adversity they faced. Shinzawa accused the team of lacking character and that might be true to some extent, but I think they showed more than a little heart in getting this far.

It doesn’t change the fact that the team will have plenty of soul searching to do going forward. Do you think the Bruins lost because of a lack of character?

Lucic: If I wanted to hurt Couture, ‘I would have hurt him’


Last night in Los Angeles, Kings forward Milan Lucic received a match penalty after skating the entire width of the ice to give San Jose’s Logan Couture a two-hand shove to the face.

Lucic didn’t hurt Couture, who had caught Lucic with an open-ice hit that Lucic didn’t like. Couture’s smiling, mocking face was good evidence that the Sharks’ forward was going to be OK.

This morning, Lucic was still in disbelief that he was penalized so harshly.

“I didn’t cross any line,” Lucic said, per Rich Hammond of the O.C. Register. “Believe me, if my intentions were to hurt him, I would have hurt him.”

While Lucic knew he deserved a penalty, he said after the game that he didn’t “know why it was called a match penalty.” His coach, Darryl Sutter, agreed, calling it “a borderline even roughing penalty.”

And though former NHL referee Kerry Fraser believes a match penalty was indeed warranted, Lucic said this morning that he hasn’t heard from the NHL about any possible supplemental discipline.

Nor for that matter has Dustin Brown, after his high hit on Couture in the first period.

In conclusion, it’s good to have hockey back.

Related: Sutter says Kings weren’t ‘interested’ in checking the Sharks

Torres apologizes to Silfverberg and Sharks


A statement from Raffi Torres:

“I accept the 41-game suspension handed down to me by the NHL’s Department of Player Safety. I worked extremely hard over the last two years following reconstructive knee surgery to resume my NHL career, and this is the last thing I wanted to happen. I am disappointed I have put myself in a position to be suspended again. I sincerely apologize to Jakob for the hit that led to this suspension, and I’m extremely thankful that he wasn’t seriously injured as a result of the play. I also want to apologize to my Sharks teammates and the organization.”

A statement from San Jose GM Doug Wilson:

“The Sharks organization fully supports the NHL’s supplementary discipline decision regarding Raffi. While we do not believe there was any malicious intent, this type of hit is unacceptable and has no place in our game. There is a difference between playing hard and crossing the line and there is no doubt, in this instance, Raffi crossed that line. We’re very thankful that Jakob was not seriously injured as a result of this play.”

Silfverberg says he expects to play Saturday when the Ducks open their regular season Saturday in San Jose.