NHL playoffs benefit from both Cinderella teams and 'dynasties'


Thumbnail image for yzerman.jpgWhen people talk about sports, they love to talk about two types of teams: dynasties and Cinderella teams. Sure, there’s something to be said for those New York Islanders and Edmonton Oilers juggernauts in the ’80s and the Montreal Canadiens in the ’70s, but who doesn’t love those teams who caught lightning in a bottle? That ’94 Rangers team didn’t exactly have a long run of dominance, did they?

The genius of the NHL playoffs is that they provide a hybrid; on one hand the Detroit Red Wings check in for their annual playoff run while each playoff tournament seems to produce a Halak-Habs, Giguere-Ducks or various iterations of the Carolina Hurricanes.

Ryan Kennedy wrote an interesting article on the very real possibility of the Red Wings’ second round dissolution and how badly sports leagues need dominant teams, something that I disagree with on a few accounts. Here’s a snippet.

As for the riff on parity, I don’t see the logic. Dynasties are what draw people to a sport, not parity. The NFL is the exception because gambling plays a big role in its popularity, but what would baseball be without the Yankees and Red Sox? Can you imagine the NBA ever giving the cold shoulder to the Lakers or Celtics? Even most European soccer leagues revolve around two or three teams each (Chelsea, Barcelona, etc.).

And think about your hockey history: There’s a treasure trove of memories built up around the early-1980s Islanders, the mid-’80s Oilers and the Canadiens of the 1970s. No one ever waxes rhapsodic about ‘that amazing stretch when Detroit, Dallas, New Jersey, then Colorado won Cups.’ No disrespect to any of those teams, but it’s tough to build much mythology out of that. And it won’t bring in the casual fan.

I couldn’t disagree more with a couple of those points. Let me break them down for you after the jump.

yankeeswin.jpgMLB, NBA = way too predictable

I can’t see how the enormous payroll difference between the Yankees, Red Sox, a few other teams and everyone else is a great thing for baseball. Sure, it’s great if the Red Sox and Yankees meet in the playoffs, but most years only one of those teams make a real run. 

And come on, aside from the most wildly devoted fans, who ever thinks that the Kansas City Royals and Pittsburgh Pirates have even an acid dream’s chance of making the playoffs? No professional sport has more hopeless fan bases than baseball and it must hurt the sport.

The NBA is in a slightly better spot, but I find myself bored to tears by the first two rounds of its playoffs, if not more. You can count the big upsets of the last 20 years on your two hands. Every year it’s the same handful of teams gunning for the title. Ho hum.

“No one waxes rhapsodic about the stretch when Detroit, Dallas, New Jersey then Colorado won Cups”

Ummm … what? No one looks back to the Detroit Red Wings-Colorado Avalanche rivalry? Ask Brandon and other Stars fans how they feel about that 5-or-so year stretch when their team was one of the big boys in the league. If anything, people don’t “wax rhapsodic” about those years because the Dead Puck Era often generated some of the most boring hockey in decades.

As usual, the answer is somewhere in between. It’s good for brand loyalty that the Penguins and Red Wings are fixtures while other teams like the Sharks are Capitals are lingering around the top. That being said, the unpredictability of hockey gives almost any hockey fan reason to dream about a deep Cup run. When every fan base has reason to believe, but there’s still a cream of the crop, then your sport is in great shape.

It’s part of why the Stanley Cup Playoffs are my favorite tournament in all of sports.

PHT Morning Skate: Beat writers survey predicts Ducks will win Cup

Corey Perry, Frederik Andersen
AP Photo
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PHT’s Morning Skate takes a look around the world of hockey to see what’s happening and what we’ll be talking about around the NHL world and beyond.

In a survey of 29 beat writers, the Anaheim Ducks emerged as the clear favorite to win the Stanley Cup. If you’ll recall, they have that in common with the EA Sports simulation. (Boston Globe)

Alex Ovechkin would pick an Olympic hit against Jaromir Jagr as the biggest check of his life. (Russian Machine Never Breaks)

Here are the highlights from Minnesota’s 5-4 victory over Colorado:

The Montreal Canadiens seem committed to using Alex Galchenyuk as a center throughout the 2015-16 campaign. (The Canadian Press)

The NHL recently enlisted its players to read off some not so mean tweets. (USA Today)

Bills coach Rex Ryan talked about the Sabres in Thursday’s press conference. (NHL.com)

Frederik Andersen may have the Anaheim Ducks’ starting job for now, but with John Gibson still a big part of their plans, Andersen has to keep proving himself. (Orange County Register)

Niemi blanks Pens, notches two assists in Stars debut

Antti Niemi, Sidney Crosby, Patric Hornqvist

DALLAS (AP) — Antti Niemi recorded his 33rd career shutout and assisted on two goals in his Dallas debut, as the Stars beat the Pittsburgh Penguins 3-0 on Thursday night in the season opener for both.

Ales Hemsky had a power-play goal and an assist.

Rookie Matthias Janmark scored on his first shot on his first shift in an NHL game to make it 1-0. The Stars acquired Niemi and Janmark in trades earlier this year.

Dallas scored on two of five power plays. Jamie Benn, the NHL’s leading scorer last season, had a power-play goal in the third period.

Niemi made 37 saves to improve his career record against the Penguins to 5-1-1. He withstood a flurry in the final minute after Pittsburgh pulled goalie Marc-Andre Fleury for an extra skater.

Fleury had 21 saves.

The Stars are 4-0-1 in their last five home games against Pittsburgh, and have won three in a row overall.

Janmark skated down the slot, took a pass from Hemsky and shot between Fleury’s legs at 1:39 of the first.

The Penguins dominated the latter half of the period, but couldn’t score. Niemi’s best stop was a reaching glove save of Rod Scuderi’s drive from the blue line with less than 3 minutes remaining. Pittsburgh outshot the Stars 10-4 in the first.

Hemsky scored at 5:42 of the second on Dallas’ first power play. His shot from the top of the right faceoff circle went in over Fleury’s right shoulder.

The Penguins again had an advantage in shots, 13-11. Pittsburgh had chances in close, but Niemi turned those away. Midway through the second, John Klingberg cleared away a loose puck from in front of the net.

Seven seconds into the Stars’ fourth power play of the third period, Jamie Benn tipped in Jason Spezza‘s shot from the right point.

NOTES: Dallas acquired Janmark as part of a March trade that sent Erik Cole to Detroit. The rookie had been playing in the Swedish Hockey League. . San Jose traded Niemi’s rights to the Stars in June for a seventh-round draft pick. Also making their Dallas debuts were LW Patrick Sharp and D Johnny Oduya, teammates with Chicago’s Stanley Cup champions last season. . In his first game for the Penguins, Phil Kessel played in his 447th straight game. . Pittsburgh was 0 for 3 on the power play.