Exploring the anger of the Detroit Red Wings fan


RedWingsFan.jpgAs someone who covers the whole of the NHL, I do my best to remain as
objective as possible. I have no rooting interests either for or
against Alex Ovechkin, Sidney Crosby, or any other team or player. While
I have been a Dallas Stars fan my entire life and started off in this
line of work writing about them, I’ve yet to come across a time when
being a Stars fan has interfered with my take on any other team or

That being said, I completely understand when fans get
protective of their team. I have championed Steve Ott for years, and
will continue to do so, even though 95% of the hockey world can’t stand
the guy. Anytime I see someone bashing Ott, I have to fight off the
desire to rush to his aid and to defend his honor; “….how dare someone
attack him like that?”

Still, I’m not irrational in my thinking
process. I know that Steve Ott has flaws, and there are times I just
want to put my head through the wall he does dumb things. So while I may
have the desire to defend him at all costs, I’m not going to blindly
defend Ott through any and all criticism, no matter what the attack may
be. Heck, they may be right about him. Sometimes.

Which is why I
don’t understand the blind defenses you see from certain fanbases. I
realize that calling out fans right now is a bit en vogue, and I really
don’t want to get into all that. But I guess I am, just by
writing this. So here goes…..

It is absolutely amazing to me the
speed and the ferocity that Red Wings will defend their team against any
and all criticism. We all know about the ‘tin foil hat’ conspiracy
theories that gain steam any goal is called into question, but it’s not
just the Red Wings consprieacy crazies that I’m referring to. It’s the
pack attack method in which they descend upon any form of criticism
directed at their team.

This afternoon, I was reading an article
on MLive.com by Detroit radio host Art Regner. Now, I’m not all too
familiar with Art’s work, but it seemed like a perfectly reasonable
article to me. He wrote that the hockey world is just waiting for a Game
7 loss tonight by the Red Wings, as it would finally signal the
beginning of the end of a historic run by the Red Wings.
Writes Art:

Make no mistake; the Wings have their collective reputations on the
line tonight in the desert. So many times hockey’s pundits have wanted
to write Detroit’s epitaph. So many times hockey’s elites have labeled
them old and done. So many times opposing general managers have
‘leaked’ that Detroit’s star players are overrated and basically not
that good.

Begrudgingly Detroit has been given praise for their enormous
accomplishments on the ice but, if they fall tonight, it will sadly
signal that the Wings’ run of dominance has sputtered and their decline
has officially begun.

Art goes on to say that the talent level of Detroit has decreased
with the salary cap, to the point that they are now facing elimination
at the hands of the Phoenix-freaking-Coyotes. Perhaps the team is
missing some of the veteran role players of the past, that’s hurt the
team as the superstars have sputtered at times in the series. The
Coyotes are a team that wins as a team; if the Wings aren’t getting
production from their star players they have issues.

Not exactly what Red Wings fans want to hear, but I doubt it’s worth a
personal attack. Yet that’s exactly what happened here, as Wings fans
descended upon him in the comments section like piranhas on a bloody
carcass in a pond.

They called his article “garbage.” Multiple times in fact. Called Art
“talentless”, “delusional” and his opinion a “joke”. Also, by saying
that it’s possible the Red Wings could be headed for trouble he
obviously “knows nothing about hockey”.

I know, I know….it’s not smart to read the comments for these
things. But it’s what you see all the time. In fact, I’ve experienced it
myself when
I wrote earlier this season
that perhaps the Red Wings were closing
in on their final window for success. By just bringing up the fact that
Detroit is getting older and isn’t exactly the dynasty it once was, I
was attacked.

George Malik, a very loyal and
beloved Red Wings blogger
, is great at what he does. But I’ve seen
countless times where he reacts with an air of appall and disdain
towards anyone that suggests something critical of his team. Suggest
that perhaps Holmstrom or Lidstrom retire? Then you have no clue what
you are talking about, young sir, and should be put out to pasture. By the way I have nothing against George, it’s just an observation.

I’m not even going to link to the Red Wings blog article that was in
response to Greg Wyshynski’s revealed Norris Trophy ballot that didn’t
have Nicklas Lidstrom in the top three. That was one vicious and angry
piece of writing. So it’s not just the commenters, although that’s where most of the anger seems to stem from; there are multiple areas across the interwebs this blind “defend at all costs” mentality comes from.

I also realize and know that not all Red Wings fans are like this. In fact, one of my best blogger friends is a Red Wings fan. So if you aren’t a crazed and angry blogger or commenter on the internet, then ignore me.

So what’s the point of all this? Am I calling out a fan base? I guess
I am. Look, everyone has the right to defend their team, but sometimes
it goes a bit overboard into “loony land”…I’m looking at you Caps

And I realize this is the internet; it’s the land of anonymous
personal attacks. That’s never going to stop. But Red Wings fans, I have
to ask why you are so defensive. Is it because you’re tired of people
suggesting your insanely successful, four-time Stanley Cup winning team
(in the past 20 years) may actually be mortal? If so, then take a

This doesn’t apply only to Red Wings fans, it all fans. It’s just
hockey. Perhaps when someone suggests your team has
flaws they might be right.

I know it doesn’t happen often, but sometimes….they might be right.

Hitchcock going to more aggressive attack for Blues

Ken Hitchcock
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ST. LOUIS (AP) After three straight first-round playoff exits, the St. Louis Blues have learned to temper expectations.

They have been consistently among the NHL’s best in the regular season and realize it is past time to build something for the long haul. The sting still lingers from the latest failure, against the Minnesota Wild last spring.

“We’re all disappointed, everybody can agree on that,” defenseman Alex Pietrangelo said. “It’s never easy to kind of think about your failures, but we grow every time it happens.”

Management isn’t ready to tear it all down yet.

“We play, in my opinion, one of the toughest if not the toughest division in the NHL, and we’ve finished first or second in the last four years,” forward Alexander Steen said. “So we have an extremely powerful team.”

Maybe a change in strategy will be enough: Coach Ken Hitchcock is back with a mandate for a more aggressive, even reckless, style of play from a roster that hasn’t changed appreciably.

“We’re coming hard from the back and we’re coming hard to see how close we can get to the attack,” Hitchcock said. “I think it’s where the game’s at; I think it’s where the game’s going to go.”

The 63-year-old Hitchcock is pushing forward, too, unwilling to dwell on the flameouts. Coach and players agree that would be “wasted energy.”

“My opinion is when you sit and think about the past, you do yourself no good,” Hitchcock said. “If you learn from the past, that’s when you do yourself a whole bunch of good.”

There were only two major roster casualties. Forward Troy Brouwer came from Washington in a trade for fan favorite T.J. Oshie. Defenseman Barret Jackman, the franchise career leader in games, wasn’t re-signed.

“If you were expecting 23 new faces to be on the roster this year, I don’t think that was realistic,” captain David Backes said. “We’re going to miss those guys in the room and on the ice, but there has been some changeover and I think it’s pretty significant.”

Things to watch for with the Blues:

GOALIE SHUFFLE: Just like last year, there’s no true No. 1 with Brian Elliott and Jake Allen sharing duties. The 25-year-old Allen missed a chance to seize the job last spring when he failed to raise his level in the playoffs.

TOP THREAT: Vladimir Tarasenko had a breakout season with 37 goals and was rewarded with an eight-year, $60 million contract. The 23-year-old winger is by far the Blues’ most dangerous scoring option and said he won’t let the money affect his play. “I never worry about it,” Tarasenko said. “If you play good, you play good.”

NEW FACES: Brouwer and center Kyle Brodziak add a physical element that was perhaps lacking a bit last season. Brouwer has three 20-plus goal seasons and Brodziak, acquired from Minnesota, fills a checking role. Veteran forward Scottie Upshall got a one-year, two-way deal after being coming to camp as a tryout. Rookie forward Robby Fabbri, a first-round pick last year, will get an early look. Another promising youngster, forward Ty Rattie, begins the year at Chicago of the AHL.

RECOVERY WARD: Forward Jori Lehteri bounced back quickly from ankle surgery and opens the season without restrictions. Another forward, Patrik Berglund, could miss half of the season following shoulder surgery.

TRACK RECORD: The Blues won the Central Division last season and Hitchcock, fourth on the career list with 708 regular-season wins, has consistently had the team near the top of the standings. “He is our coach, tough cookies if you don’t like it,” Backes said. “From my experience, he puts together one heck of a game plan.”

It looks like Havlat won’t make Panthers

Martin Havlat

As PHT’s mentioned before, the Florida Panthers stand as a fascinating contrast between youth and experience.

Let’s not kid ourselves, though; fresh faces usually beat out gray beards, at least when it comes to teams that are still trying to build toward contender status.

While it’s by no means official, two Panthers beat writers – the Miami Herald’s George Richards and the Florida Sun-Sentinel’s Harvey Fialkov – report that the Panthers are likely to pass on Martin Havlat.

It wasn’t just about the likes of Jonathan Huberdeau and Nick Bjugstad leading the charge. Other young Panthers (maybe most notably Quinton Howden and Connor Brickley) made the team, thus making Havlat less necessary.

One would assume that it might be tough for the 34-year-old to find work, at least if he insists upon only an NHL deal.

Health issues continue to dog him, but he’s no longer one of those guys who tantalizes with talent when he is healthy enough to play.

Havlat also doesn’t really bring much to the table defensively. While other veterans can kill penalties and show a little more verstaility, Havlat’s greatest selling point is scoring.

Could this be it for a solid career that may nonetheless end with a “What if?” or two?