Reaction to Jacques Lemaire's retirement

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Lemaire1.jpgHere’s a rundown of reactions from across the blogosphere on the news
of Jacques Lemaire’s retirement, and what this means for the immediate
future of the franchise.

John
Fischer of In Lou We Trust
as an epic (it’s expected with ILWT)
post on the firing, opining on the past season with Lemaire at the he
helm:

What I felt was the most impressive was how he structured the team so
they could continue winning so many games in November and December in
spite
of all the injuries.  Mind you, these were injuries to Paul Martin, Dainius
Zubrus
, Patrik Elias, etc.,
etc. – a far cry from just a few guys being day-to-day for a week or
so.  The Devils didn’t have a fully healthy roster until Martin came
back in the first half of March 2010.   The Devils have had multiple
rookies from Lowell in the lineup and while it wasn’t always pretty,
the success still came.   Yes, the Devils slumped in the first two
months 2010 (and the first week of March) but short of the very elite
teams, teams tend to regress to their mean over time anyway.

More reactions after the jump.

Greg
Wyshynski of Puck Daddy c
ompares this season to 1998, Lemaire’s
last with the Devils (before this season, of course):

We know that the 2010 New Jersey Devils are the 1998 New Jersey
Devils, who lost in the first round against the Ottawa Senators. That
postseason saw a superstar veteran acquisition, who never fit the
system, play well in his final games for the franchise (Doug Gilmour
then; Ilya Kovalchuk(notes) potentially now);
Devils mainstays underachieve mightily in the playoffs (leading
goal-scorer Bobby Holik(notes) earned no points and a
minus-4 then; Jamie Langenbrunner’s(notes) one assist and a
minus-1 now); and Lemaire leave the bench after the season, after both
first-round disasters may have indicated players were quitting on him
and his methods.

Adrian Dater, writing
for Versus.com
, says that Lou Lamoriello should perhaps look at
himself now:

Jacques Lemaire was the latest New Jersey Devils coach to fall on his
sword, stepping down from the bench Monday after a disastrous
five-game first-round loss to Philadelphia. He joins a long list of
fall guys for Devils GM-for-life, Lou Lamoriello. Lemaire’s departure
means the Devils have now been through an incredible six coaches since
last winning the Cup in 2003 – one of them being Lou himself.

The question now is, when will Lamoriello take a good look in the
mirror? When will Lamoriello ever come out and say, “You know what,
folks, this one is on me.” Lamoriello is only too happy to take all the
credit when things go well — and there is no doubt that a lot of
things have gone very well for the Devils under his watch.

Quick note – I’m not certain this is a case of Lamoriello blaming
Lemaire for anything. By all accounts, Lemaire just didn’t have it in
him to continue and last season Brent Sutter ‘tricked’ the Devils before
moving on to Calgary.

Eric
Duhatschek of the Globe & Mail
says that it’s tough to see
Lamaire go, but perhaps it’s for the best.

Lemaire was something of an innovator as a coach –
because of his particular attention to defensive hockey, something borne
of his own playing experience and the fact that he started his coaching
career in Switzerland. Sadly, when the Devils won that year, it also
introduced the dreaded term ‘neutral zone trap’ into the popular hockey
lexicon. Given how the NHL is a copycat league, it became the de
rigueur style for the better part of a decade.

Here’s your Stanley Cup playoffs schedule for today

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After the Eastern Conference Game 2s played out on Saturday, we’re getting the Western Conference set today. You can watch the action via NBC Sports Group’s television and digital platforms.

Here’s a quick overview of where specifically you can watch the contests:

St. Louis at Dallas (3:00 p.m. ET)

If you want to watch the game on television, NBC is the channel to do that. If you want to stream the game with the NBC Sports Live Extra app, click here.

Nashville at San Jose (8:00 p.m. ET)

The game will be televised on NBCSN. You can also stream the contest by clicking here.

Here’s some relevant pregame reading material:

With Eaves injured, Nichushkin will play for Stars in Game 2

Hitchcock, Blues know they need to slow down the Stars … but can they?

Sharks swarm in the third period, take down Predators in Game 1

Speed, skill help Stars score late victory to take series lead over Blues

Video: Penguins coach takes issue with late, high Orpik hit on Maatta

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The Pittsburgh Penguins have spoken out against a late, high hit that Washington Capitals defenseman Brooks Orpik threw on Olli Maatta early in the first period of an eventful Game 2 on Saturday.

Maatta left and didn’t return. He played only 31 seconds, and the Penguins were reduced to five defensemen for a large portion of the game. Orpik was given a minor penalty on the play, but the league’s Department of Player Safety may see it differently.

The hit occurred well after Maatta had gotten rid of the puck. He struggled on his way to the dressing room for further evaluation.

Based on multiple reports, Orpik wasn’t made available to the media following the game, which went to the Penguins as they earned the split on the road.

But the Penguins have taken issue with the hit.

“I thought it was a late hit,” said Penguins coach Mike Sullivan, as per CSN Mid-Atlantic. “I thought it was a target to his head. I think it’s the type of hit everyone in hockey is trying to remove from the game.”

Game on: Penguins even series with rival Capitals

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The Pittsburgh Penguins will head back home with a split of their second-round series with the rival Washington Capitals.

Former Capitals forward Eric Fehr came back to burn his hold team, as he scored with under five minutes remaining in regulation to help lift the Penguins over Washington with a 2-1 victory in an eventful Game 2 on Saturday. Evgeni Malkin threw the puck toward the net and Fehr was able to re-direct it by Braden Holtby.

Oh, this was an eventful game, indeed.

It started early in the first period with Capitals defenseman Brooks Orpik catching Penguins blue liner Olli Maatta with a late and high hit that warranted — at least for now — only a minor penalty for interference. Maatta, clearly in distress following the hit, didn’t play another shift and saw only 31 seconds of ice time in total, as Pittsburgh was reduced to five defensemen for the remainder of the game.

It continued in the third period. Kris Letang was furious after getting called for a trip on Justin Williams, and even more ticked off when the Capitals tied the game on the ensuing power play.

For two periods, the Capitals couldn’t get much going. Only four of their players had registered a shot on goal through 40 minutes, while the Penguins held the edge in that department and held the lead.

Washington came out with more jump in the third period, testing rookie netminder Matt Murray with 14 shots in the final 20 minutes. But the Penguins got the late goal to break the deadlock.

Video: Penguins’ Letang was furious after Capitals tie up Game 2 with power play goal

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Kris Letang watched from the penalty box as the Washington Capitals tied up Game 2 with a power play goal in the third period. The Pittsburgh Penguins defenseman was called for tripping after he appeared to muscle Justin Williams off the puck as he entered the zone.

Letang let his disagreement with the call be known at the time, and was furious after the Capitals capitalized on a goal from Marcus Johansson.

The Capitals started the period down a goal and being outshot 28-10 by the Penguins, who need a win to even the series.

Also, it seems this is worth mentioning: