Canucks players speak about NHL 'conspiracy'


DSedin1.jpgLike I said yesterday, this conspiracy talk in the NHL isn’t going
away anytime soon, and if the Canucks lose this first round series it
will just keep heating up. I will say this, and it’s something that one
of my good friends brought up yesterday, that if the NHL is conspiring
against the Canucks then they have a mess of conspiracies to try and
keep sorted out all at the same time:

The NHL’s conspiracy against
Alex Ovechkin and the Capitals.

The NHL’s conspiracy against the
Detroit Red Wings (this one makes no sense to me at all).

NHL’s conspiracy against Canadian teams, especially since Gary Bettman
took over in 1994.

Now we have the NHL’s conspiracy against the
Canucks, so that the Los Angeles Kings will advance and the NHL can get
better TV ratings in the playoffs.

I don’t buy any of it. Is the
NHL guilty of inconsistent officiating and inconsistent judgment on
suspensions and supplementary punishment? Yes. Is the NHL guilty of
trying to change to much of the game of hockey to appeal to broader

Of course, the shootout and the trapezoid were horrible ideas.
But conspiring so that certain teams advance in the playoffs for better
numbers in the finals? How do you explain Carolina and Edmonton then?
Ottawa and Anaheim?

What do the players say?

The conspiracy theorists will always be loud
and when there are bad decisions that are made, those voices will ring
out louder. What I want to know is what the players think, and thanks
to Terry Jones of the Ottawa Sun
, we have some thoughts. Jones does
a great job of going through the various theories that run rampant
regarding the Canucks, before getting to these words from some Canucks
players on whether the NHL has it out for the team:

“No. Not at all,” said Burrows after the morning skate Wednesday. “I
hope not. I don’t think so. They’ve got a tough job to do and those were
not easy calls.

“Nobody is against us. Hopefully the calls will start to go our way,”
he added.

“You earn your own breaks and we’re not earning our breaks right
now,” said Daniel Sedin.

“I don’t think it’s like that at all,” said Roberto Luongo. “Whatever
calls are made are out of our control. And I’m a big believe that you
make your own breaks.”

These guys have it right. The NHL may make some bad decisions every
now and then, but what the do not control is how these teams play. If
you watch the games in this series, it’s become obvious how overmatched
the Cancucks are at times. The Kings have more jump, better execution
and are just killing the Canucks on the power play. Roberto Luongo is
playing horribly, that must be the NHL’s doing.

As far as the ‘kicked’ goal by Sedin. This wasn’t Mike Murphy and the
War Room making anything up. There is precedent for a goal that’s not
exactly kicked in to be disallowed, and
both involve Brenden Morrow.

Avs unveil new third jerseys

Avs Jerseys

The Avalanche will be throwing a bunch of different looks at us this season.

Having already released specialized “Mile High” jerseys for February’s Stadium Series game, the Avs unveiled new third sweaters on Friday — less than 24 hours after a bitter 5-4 home loss to Minnesota in their season opener.

(Guess Colorado wanted to send out some good vibes after blowing a 4-1 third-period lead.)

While undoubtedly exciting for the organization, the release of these new thirds isn’t taking anybody by surprise. Last month, several websites published leaked images of Colorado’s and Anaheim’s third jerseys, so the design has been in the public eye for several weeks.

The Avs will debut these new thirds on Oct. 24, in a Saturday night tilt against Columbus.

Related: Roy explains why he didn’t call time out

Report: Escrow set at 16 percent

Gary Bettman, Donald Fehr
1 Comment

Hey, remember in June when the NHLPA voted to keep the five-percent growth factor in spite of increasing worries about escrow?

Well, here’s why that decision was a significant one, via TSN’s Frank Seravalli:

With early revenue projections in place, the NHL and NHLPA set the escrow withholding rate for players at 16 per cent for the first quarter of the season on Thursday.

That means every player will have 16 per cent of earnings deducted from their paycheque and put aside until after all of this season’s hockey-related revenue is counted to ensure a perfect 50-50 revenue split with owners.

Now, this doesn’t mean that the players will definitely lose 16 percent of their salaries. Typically, they receive refunds when all the accounting is done.

Still, 16 percent is a good-sized chunk to withhold. They won’t be thrilled about it.

Related: To understand escrow, consider Duncan Keith