Memories of Mike Modano

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Modano4.jpgI’m not going to do an exact retrospective on Mike Modano’s great
career, since we’re not even certain he’s retiring. If and when he
announces his retirement this summer, then we’ll take a look at his
great numbers and career accomplishments. For now, I’m just going to
talk about Mike Modano and my memories of the best player in Stars
franchise history as he plays what is likely his final home game tonight
against the Anaheim Ducks.

I grew up a Dallas Stars fan, when my family and I worked as
volunteers at Reunion Arena in the early 1990’s. It was incredible for
me to be able to be so close to the players and the behind the scenes
workings of a hockey game, especially since many times we covered the
entrance where the players would enter before the games. Shane Churla,
Kevin Hatcher, Dave Gagner, Grant Ledyard, Todd Harvey — all players
that I was able to get to know off the ice. Mike Modano? Well, he was
this mystical figure that everyone was crazy about, and when he
acknowledged you with “hi”, a pat on the head or a hand shake it was
just an incredible feeling.

Of course, it’s the memories of Modano
on the ice that stand out to me. It’s tough to pinpoint very specific
moments without looking them up; instead, it’s a mashup of nearly 20
years of memories that leave me with just an overall feeling of greatness and the feeling of watching a legend play night in and night out.

Modano2.jpgThe
sight of Modano flying effortless across the ice from one end to the
other, that Stars jersey flapping in the wind, is the image that will
always be in my head when thinking of Modano. I don’t know if there’s
any other player in the NHL that was able to be so much faster than
those around him without looking like he was skating that much harder.

His
ability to bury a one timer from anywhere on the ice. It’s not exactly
at the level that Brett Hull reached in his career, but that was easily
Modano’s best asset. That smooth, easy and extremely powerful stroke
that was deadly accurate is a shot that he still uses to this day, and
every time he finds some way to score on a hard shot from a bad angle it
brings chills to my skin.

I’ll also never forget Modano’s
backhand shot, an art that seems to be lost these days and one that
Modano used to score with from incredible angles. I’ll never forget
seeing Modano score from near the blue line on an incredibly accurate
backhand shot, that painted the upper corner of the net. I don’t think
I’ve ever seen a shot quite like that.

His offense and his speed
will always be what Modano is known for, but it’s his selflessness and
his team-first attitude are what I’ll remember most. Mike Modano was
drafted by the Minnesota North Stars for his incredible offensive
ability, yet after the team moved to Dallas and hired Ken Hitchcock as
coach the franchise shifted philosophies. The Stars became a defensive
team, and asked Modano to take on a more defensive-minded approach. Not
only did he embrace the new role but he became perhaps the best wo-way
player in the NHL.

Later in his career, he was asked to become a
checking line center as his offensive skills and speed declined and
fully embraced that role as well. He had the option of leaving Dallas
for a more lucrative contract a few years back, but instead took a bit
of a discount to stay with the team he’s always played for. The
incredible line of Brett Hull, Mike Modano and Jere Lehtinen will go
down as the best line the Stars have ever and likely ever will put on
the ice. Modano’s playmaking ability perfectly matched with Hull’s
scoring tough, and Lehtinen rounded it all off with some incredible
defensive prowess.

I’ll also never forget seeing Mike Modano slam
into the boards behind the net after Ruslan Sulei gave him a nice push
in the back. He slammed head first into the boards, a sight that
immediately looked as though Modano had broken his neck. It’s perhaps
the most gruesome play I had ever seen in hockey, and seeing Modano lie
motionless on the ice as he was strapped into a stretcher made everyone
immediately question what life would be like without him on the team.
There were tears in the eyes of every Stars fan that night.

It’s
tough to imagine the Dallas Stars taking the ice without Mike Modano on
the team. He’s been the face of the franchise for so long, and was the
perfect player for the team to have to be able to market the team in
Dallas. He helped make hockey into a incredibly popular sport in North
Texas and I’m still struggling to think of him not playing with a Stars
jersey on his back.

He may come back next season, but I doubt he
does it with any team other than the Dallas Stars. He’s passed up
numerous opportunities to be traded to much better teams contending for
the Stanley Cup, and he’s decided to stay in Dallas even through these
tough seasons of late. He is and forever will be a Dallas Star, and if
he does retire he will instantly be welcomed to be a member of the front
office. He may be part of an ownership group that purchases the
franchise but if not, he’ll be associated with the team in some
important capacity as soon as he retires.

Modano3.jpg

If this is indeed your
final home game in Dallas, Mike, then we bid you a warm and teary-eyed
adieu.

Tortorella admits Jackets ‘laid an egg’ in Game 4

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Columbus Blue Jackets head coach John Tortorella clearly wasn’t happy about the way his team played in Game 4 of their first-round series against the Washington Capitals. He was pretty clear about it after his team’s 4-1 loss.

His post-game press conference shouldn’t be described as “vintage Torts,” it was more like “Torts classic”.

After a few minutes of answering questions, Tortorella got fed up with the line of questioning.

“We weren’t good,” Tortorella said after the game. “We weren’t good! There’s no sense in asking me things about the game. I’m telling you, we laid an egg. So I’m not going to break it down for you. We sucked! We sucked! So let’s move by it and see if we play better on Saturday afternoon.”

The next reporter tried to ask a follow-up question and was given the same treatment.

“We laid an egg. That’s all I have to say guys, I’m sorry. I’m not going to break it down for you. Nothing went well for us. We have to figure it out and we will.”

Torts walked off after the next question.

After winning the first two games of the series on the road, the Blue Jackets managed to drop both contests at home. This best-of-seven series is tied up at two, with Game 5 coming up in Washington on Saturday afternoon.

They’ve got to be better than they were in Game 4. The stats don’t lie:

Joey Alfieri is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @joeyalfieri.

PHT Morning Skate: How Marchand became a pest; What are Rangers looking for in new coach?

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Welcome to the PHT Morning Skate, a collection of links from around the hockey world. Have a link you want to submit? Email us at phtblog@nbcsports.com.

Sean Couturier, who missed Game 4 against Pittsburgh, could return to the lineup in Game 5. The Flyers could certainly use a boost, especially because elimination is staring them right in the face. (NHL.com)

• Madison Square Garden executive chairman James Dolan admitted that the next coach of the New York Rangers will have to understand how to develop young players. (New York Post)

• All the success the Golden Knights have had in their inaugural season makes absolutely no sense, according to Vice’s Dave Lozo. They’ve used a bunch of cast-offs and they’ve been successful doing so. (Vice)

• Ever wonder how Brad Marchand became a pest? Well, he outlines it for you in this story he wrote for The Players’ Tribune.

• The Hart Trophy doesn’t always go to the player with the best offensive numbers. (Greatest Hockey Legends)

• The Carolina Hurricanes have hired Paul Krepelka to be their Vice President of Hockey Operations. He has NHL experience as a player, attorney, agent and manager. (NHL.com/Hurricanes)

• The Athletic’s Katie Strang wrote an emotional piece about former NHLer David Gove story. Gove was the victim of sexual abuse, and it affected him until the day he died. (The Athletic)

• NHL official Shandor Alphonso didn’t dream of being an official,  but he’s now working in the NHL. Sportsnet wrote an interesting story about how he went from a financial advisor to being an official in the best league in the world. (Sportsnet)

• Devin is an eight-year-old Predators fan that has battled cancer during his young life. Not only have the Preds made an impact on him, but it’s pretty clear that he’s had an impact on some of the players on the roster. (Tennessean)

• After another miserable season in Buffalo, owner Terry Pegula wrote a letter to season ticket holders telling them that the team won’t be raising prices. (Buffalo News)

• Even though he was fired by the Calgary Flames, Glen Gulutzan believes the team’s future is bright. (Calgary Herald)

• The Art Dorrington foundation, which is named after the first black player to sign an NHL contract, is struggling with funding right now. Atlantic City mayor Frank Gilliam is holding back the $25,000 that was supposed to be given to the foundation. (AC Primetime)

Joey Alfieri is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @joeyalfieri.

The Buzzer: Ovechkin is clutch

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Two games on Thursday

Bruins 3, Maple Leafs 1 (Bruins lead series 3-1)

The Boston Bruins continue to show that they can survive – if not thrive – with key players out of the lineup. They don’t get much more “key” than Patrice Bergeron, who was unable to suit up for Game 4. Even so, Tuukka Rask made some crucial saves and the Bruins connected on two 2-on-1 rushes to snag a 3-1 series lead. The Maple Leafs must grapple with a lot of uncomfortable questions as they see their season slip to the brink of elimination.

Capitals 4, Blue Jackets 1 (Series tied 2-2)

This game was all about patterns continuing, or breaking.

Continuing: The road team winning. The away team has won all four contests during this series, so this one returns to Washington with the two teams now tied up 2-2. It’s also another instance of Alex Ovechkin being sneaky-clutch, although many people will disagree because of team results. Washington’s starting to pull away in terms of puck possession during the series, and that continued on Thursday, too.

Breaking: For the first time in the series, the game ended in regulation. It wasn’t all that close, either, as the Caps won 4-1 and were safe even considering one empty-netter.

[NBC’s Stanley Cup Playoff Hub]

Three Stars

1. Tuukka Rask, Boston Bruins – There will be talk of Bergeron, Auston Matthews not being able to score, Mike Babcock’s decisions, and other factors from Game 4. Rask helped to push those discussions to the forefront – rather than talk about which team has the edge if they ended up tied – as he was sharp on Thursday. Rask stopped 31 out of 32 shots, factoring heavily in Boston building a 3-1 series lead against Toronto.

2. Evgeny Kuznetsov, Washington Capitals – After scoring two goals in Game 1, Kuznetsov had been held silent by the Bruins in Games 2 and 3. The Russian center made up for lost time in Game 4, scoring an empty-netter and two assists in that 4-1 win. Both of his assists were primary helpers, while he checked many other boxes by winning more than half of his draws (10 of 18), generating a +3 rating, and firing four shots on goal.

3. Alex Ovechkin, Capitals – Ovechkin fired a shot on Sergei Bobrovsky, which created a rebound opportunity for T.J. Oshie during a Washington power play, a goal that ended up being the game-winner. Ovechkin also scored from the right face-off circle for an important insurance goal. Ovechkin fired five SOG and was a +1 in Game 4.

Factoids

There’s plenty of focus on Bergeron being out and Marchand scoring/agitating, but don’t forget about David Pastrnak‘s brilliance.

Again, Alex Ovechkin is more clutch than people realize. By scoring the 49th playoff goal of his career, Ovechkin tied Henri Richard for 60th in NHL history. You may remember Henri as a) Maurice Richard’s brother and b) the guy who won the Stanley Cup 11 times.

Friday’s games

Philadelphia Flyers at Pittsburgh Penguins, 7 p.m. ET, NBCSN
Minnesota Wild at Winnipeg Jets, 7:30 p.m. ET, USA Network
Colorado Avalanche at Nashville Predators, 9:30 p.m. ET, NBCSN

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.

Capitals tie series with Blue Jackets

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In Game 4, the Washington Capitals showed their heart by not working overtime.

The Capitals dropped both of their home games to start their first-round series against the Columbus Blue Jackets, opening the floodgates for people to dust off their favorite, cruel jokes about this team. They’ll return home with those one-liners drying up, though.

After falling behind 2-0 in the series, the Capitals flipped the script to tie it up 2-2 after beating the Blue Jackets both times in Columbus. The symmetry wasn’t complete, however; while Washington continued the series trend of overtime nail-biters by winning beyond regulation in Game 3, they made no mistake about winning Game 4 by a score of 4-1.

[NBC’s Stanley Cup Playoff Hub]

This wasn’t a case where the Bruins got the bounces and the finishes to win. The Capitals have shown signs of dominance even in defeats during this series, but they really smothered the Blue Jackets in Game 4.

The Capitals generated a 33-24 shots on goal edge, won about two-thirds of the faceoffs, and generally carried the play by every metric.

Tom Wilson making it 1-0 was valuable, and jokes about blown 2-0 leads aside, T.J. Oshie‘s eventual game-winner was important during the second period. Alex Ovechkin‘s goal from his opposite office widened the gap too much for an overmatched Blue Jackets team, even with Boone Jenner scoring and giving Columbus a brief boost.

With a goal and an assist in Game 4, this is yet another reminder that Ovechkin is a playoff performer, even if his team isn’t always there with him. After Washington went down 2-0 against Columbus, Ovechkin said “it’s going to be fun when we bounce back and tie the series,” and that’s exactly the situation Washington is in after … whatever the opposite of “holding serve” is.

Of course, people will quickly forget this triumph-within-the-series if the Capitals ultimately bow out of the first round, anyway.

The Caps must feel really good about their collective play as they aim to become the first team to win at home in this series in Game 5. Their power play has been productive, playing tight defense, getting scoring from Ovechkin/others, and Braden Holtby looks poised in regaining his usual spot in net. It’s the sort of stretch that changes the Capitals’ narrative from “here we go again” to “could this be the year we finally make a run?”

With this series now essentially becoming a best two-out-of-three clash, the disposition could easily go from sunny back to gloomy, but give this beleaguered group credit for keeping cool heads and making this anyone’s game once again.

James O’Brien is a writer for Pro Hockey Talk on NBC Sports. Drop him a line at phtblog@nbcsports.com or follow him on Twitter @cyclelikesedins.