Red Wings goaltending successful through the years

Howard2.jpgPhiladelphia Flyers vs. Detroit Red Wings
p.m. EST – Sunday, April 4, 2010
Live on NBC

There’s no
doubt that the Detroit Red Wings are the most stable and successful
franchise of the past 20 years. The New Jersey Devils are a close
second, but four Stanley Cup championships put the Wings over the top.
What’s amazing is how Detroit has been able to change their approach
over that span to stay successful even as the NHL evolved from the
1990’s free agency extravaganza to the post-lockout era.

incredible is how they’ve been able to do it, no matter who might be in

Since the Red Wings’ dynasty truly began in 1996, there have
been two staples in net: Chris Osgood and Dominik Hasak. Both
goaltenders won Stanley Cups with the team, left via free agency only to
return later in their careers to have further success.

Now we have
Jimmy Howard, the next to carry the torch.

Defense or

It’s the chicken or the egg question; has the Red
Wings’ goaltending all these years been truly great, or has the stellar
defense Detroit is known for been the main contributor to the team’s
success? Less take a look at the regular season stats for Detroit’s
goaltending in each Stanley Cup season:


The goals-against numbers
certainly stand out (although in 96-98 those were just…alright), but
it’s the save percentage that is the true measure. 91% is a good median
for success, the Detroit goaltenders have always hovered around that
number. Osgood and Hasak split time in 07-08, but Hasak was just
that season. Relatively, at least.

So the Detroit
goaltenders were great, but not exactly dominant. Once the playoffs
started they were out of this world, but in the regular season they good
enough to be great. That Osgood had struggles elsewhere speaks to how
successful the Detroit system truly is.

Next in line: Jimmy

Jimmy Howard is on his way to being better than both.
Well, in the regular season at least. The rookie sensation has stolen
the starting position from Osgood (who continues to decline,
expectantly) and is on pace to have one of the better seasons for the
Red Wings than they’ve had in a long time. The wins (34) are impressive,
the GAA is nice (2.30), but it’s the .923 save percentage that stands
out. That’s the best test of a goaltender’s effectiveness, and Howard
has only become better as the season progressed.

Of course, having
success in the playoffs versus the regular season is the true test.
Having a veteran like Osgood backing you is perhaps the best scenario
any goaltender can ask for.

Scroll Down For:

    Personal reasons: No Ovechkin for Caps tonight

    Alex Ovechkin
    1 Comment

    Alex Ovechkin won’t play for the Washington Capitals on Tuesday because of personal reasons, the team confirmed.

    He entered the building considerably later than usual, but his presence at least opened the door for the possibility of No. 8 suiting up against the San Jose Sharks.

    Instead, the Capitals will face the hot-starting Sharks without Ovechkin (personal reasons) and Nicklas Backstrom (injury).

    That’s a tall order, yet it’s also an opportunity for Barry Trotz to prove his system is a difference-maker … and that the Capitals have the young players to take up the mantle when the big stars are out

    This is how Washington’s forward lines may look tonight:

    No, the Capitals have not shared details regarding what his “personal reasons” might be, by the way.

    Bruins put Morrow on IR, bring up Cross

    Brady Skjei, Joe Morrow
    Leave a comment

    Lower-level defense is not the biggest of many worries for the Boston Bruins, yet it might be another in a series of headaches.’s Joe Haggerty points out that Joe Morrow has been placed on IR while AHL stalwart Tommy Cross was called up.

    With a -3 rating and negligible offensive impact so far, few will really be missing Morrow (pictured). From the way Haggerty describes Cross, it’s a pretty cool story if he gets into the lineup:

    Cross was named captain of the Providence Bruins this season, and actually had a strong training camp as the hard-hitting, tough stay-at-home defenseman he’s developed into during his five years in the B’s minor league system. The 2007 second round pick was a highly regarded potential puck-moving defenseman when he was drafted prior to his Boston College career, but a series of knee injuries negated some of his speed and puck-moving capabilities.

    Granted, the Bruins would prefer a sure-thing improvement over a feel-good story right now, as this 0-3-0 start marks their worst beginning in some time.

    Injuries have been an issue in general, too, with Zdeno Chara‘s slow start mixed with Dennis Seidenberg on the mend and Brad Marchand in limbo.

    The Bruins’ next game comes against the Avalanche in Colorado. Maybe they’ll start to mend things on the ice?