Carcillo's return lifts Flyers past Red Wings, 4-3

Flyers4.jpgAfter being suspended two games for an “unintentional” high stick, it was decided that perhaps Dan Carcillo would be a snappy choice to start the game. It paid off instantly, and set the tone for the rest of a very, very big win for the Philadelphia Flyers.

Carcillo scored just 17 seconds into the first period when his wrist shot from the left circle found it’s way through Chris Osgood’s glove. It was a fitting start for Carcillo, who has become the emotional leader of a team on the brink of falling out of the playoffs and the atmosphere at Wachovia after he scored was electric.

“I wouldn’t say I gave anything extra today,” Carcillo said after the game. “We just went out and I played my game.”

Be careful to lay this win solely on Carcillo’s emotional spark. He played just 8:24 and finished with one shot, one goal and one hit, well below what we’re used to seeing from him this season. Yet despite the workmanlike team win, there’s no doubt that Carcillo’s presence boosted a team that needed some sort of spark.

And is there no greater fit for Carcillo than here in Philadelphia? He’s become an instant fan favorite with his physical style and his emotional approach to the game, and the Flyers fans have embraced a player that embodies the Philadelphia way of playing.

The Flyers live to fight another day, as they stave off a late-season collapse for one more game. They were able to take advantage of a tired, sluggish Red Wings team that was starting Chris Osgood in net — who challenged Boucher in a contest for “who can allow the most soft goals in a game”.

The Flyers will head to Toronto before taking on the New York Rangers in back to back games to close out the regular season, in a series that will decide the fate of both teams. Philadelphia was able to get two points out of a Detroit team that entered the weekend as the hottest in the NHL.

The Flyers locker room was far from celebratory after the win. The players were solemn as they talked about the victory, as they know their fate was delayed until the next game, when they’ll have to win the next Biggest Game Of The Season.

For now, Carcillo’s toothless grin while talking about a third period scrum with Tomas Holmstrom will be as much cheering as the team can afford.

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    NHL has no plans to change waiver rules

    Manny Malhotra Ryan Stanton
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    Even with all the young players that have been healthy scratches this season, don’t expect the NHL to change its waiver rules.

    Deputy commissioner Bill Daly told PHT in an email that it’s not something that’s “ever been considered.”

    “For better or worse that’s what waiver rules are there for,” Daly wrote. “They force Clubs to make tough decisions.”

    Today, Montreal defenseman Jarred Tinordi became the latest waiver-eligible youngster to be sent to the AHL on a two-week conditioning loan.

    Tinordi, 23, has yet to play a single game for the Habs this season. If he were still exempt from waivers, he’d have undoubtedly been sent to the AHL long before he had to watch so many NHL games from the press box.

    In light of situations like Tinordi’s, some have suggested the NHL change the rules. Currently, the only risk-free way for waiver-eligible players to get playing time in the AHL is via conditioning stint, and, as mentioned, those are limited to 14 days in length.

    So the Habs will, indeed, need to make a “tough decision” when Tinordi’s conditioning stint is up. Do they put him in the lineup? Do they keep him in the press box and wait for an injury or some other circumstance to create an opportunity for him to play? Do they risk losing him to waivers by attempting to send him to the AHL? Do they trade him?

    Your call, Marc Bergevin.

    Related: Stanislav Galiev is stuck in the NHL

    Ortio clears waivers, assigned to Flames’ AHL team

    Joni Ortio
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    Joni Ortio has cleared waivers and been assigned to AHL Stockton, the Calgary Flames announced today.

    The 24-year-old goalie was always likely to clear, what with his dreadful numbers this season (0-2-1, .868),

    But we suppose there was always the chance he’d get picked up, so it’s a relief for the Flames all the same. With a little more time to hone his game in the AHL, Ortio could still turn out to be a quality NHL netminder.

    In a related move, veteran goalie Jonas Hiller has been activated from injured reserve. Hiller and Karri Ramo are the only goalies on the Flames’ active roster now.

    Price placed on injured reserve; Yakupov to miss 2-4 weeks with sprained ankle

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    Two injury updates in one post.

    First, the situation with Montreal goalie Carey Price, who was hurt last night versus the Rangers.

    According to Canadiens coach Michel Therrien, Price has been placed on injured reserve with a lower-body injury. That means he’ll be out at least a week, though no exact timeline was provided.

    “We don’t know how long Carey will be out, but for us it’s business as usual,” said Therrien.

    Mike Condon will get the start tomorrow in New Jersey.

    As for Oilers forward Nail Yakupov, he’ll be out 2-4 weeks after spraining his ankle last night in Carolina while getting tangled up with a linesman.

    Getzlaf didn’t love the ‘dead’ atmosphere at Coyotes game

    Martin Erat, Ryan Getzlaf

    Ducks captain Ryan Getzlaf wasn’t impressed with at least two things last night in Arizona:

    1. His team’s performance in a 4-2 loss to the Coyotes.
    2. The atmosphere inside Gila River Arena, where the announced attendance was just 11,578.

    “It’s hard. When you come into a building … it’s dead,” Getzlaf told the O.C. Register. “Nothing against the fans. It’s hard to fill a big building like this and have the amount of people in it to build your energy. So you have to do it yourself. You have to be ready when you step on the ice. I thought we came out flat.”

    Anaheim’s record fell to 8-11-4 with the defeat.

    The Coyotes’ average attendance also fell, to 13,144 in eight games.