Lost at sea without a skipper: The plight of the NY Rangers

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drury.jpgBoston Bruins vs. New York Rangers
12:30 p.m. EST – Sunday, March 21, 2010
Live on NBC

Join us for a live chat during today’s game at Noon EST.

When Sean Avery is the only player on your team that shows any
personality, that has any sort of ability to muster up the motivation to
raise his level of play when it counts, then perhaps succeeding in the playoffs is the least of your worries.

The New York Rangers, in March and in the
middle of a playoff race, are searching for an identity as a team.
What’s more, as soon as any of the players start to show some life or personality towards the media and the public, coach John
Tortorella is quick to squash it and calls his players out for speaking
out of turn.

Is it even possible for a team like this to actually
make it to the playoffs?

No future without any life.

Yesterday I gave my reasons why the Rangers would find a way to pass the
Bruins for 8th in the East, but I have to admit that was a tough task to
tackle. I’ve watched a number of Rangers games this season — full
games, not just skimming through on Center Ice like I have to do each
night — and one thing is becoming extremely clear as the playoffs near:
the New York Rangers don’t care.

I’m not convinced this is a team
that even wants to make the playoffs. Thanks to some major issues that
the Boston Bruins have had of their own the past few weeks, the Rangers
have had the chance to not only catch up to Boston in the standings but
to actually surpass them.

The way they’ve played in these big
games lately, you would have guessed they were trying to tank the season
for the number one draft pick this summer.

Will the real,
overpaid and outdated leader please stand up?

I can only
imagine how Rangers fans felt watching Chris Drury in the Olympics. As
an American, I couldn’t have been more proud of the veteran who was the
heart and soul — aside from Ryan Miller — of Team USA; selling out his
body to block shots, giving it 120% every shift. It seemed our doubts
as to why he had been chosen for the team were not applicable this time.

Drury
has just one goal and six points in the nine games since the Olympics;
not… bad, but certainly not what you’d expect from your captain
while the team is in the midst of a playoff race.

He at least tried to be a bit of leader
this past week, as he called out his team as being ‘immature’, until
coach Tortorella was able to stuff the muzzle back over his mouth and
put him back into the locker room closet.

So if Drury can’t step
up as the leader of this team, who then? Marian Gaborik? He’s more
concerned about just scoring goals and protecting his injury-prone body
than actually winning and leading a team. Ryan Callahan perhaps, but
Torts would probably put the kabosh on anything he tries to do. Perhaps
being a leader is overrated; it seems that’s the way Tortorella sees it, at
least.

Just go out and play.

I can see Tortorella’s point
in one regard; the players should just shut their mouths and actually
produce on the ice. We have all this talk and consternation about locker
room leadership and the perception in the media, what about actually
winning once the games start? If you are as intent on winning and being
successful as you claim; show it in the games.

We all know there’s
one player on the team who can actually muster the motivation to raise
the level of his game, but those are for purely selfish reasons. The
rest of the team is just content to skate through each game on their way
to the golf course in April.

The good news? They play a team with
very similar issues today on NBC.

Chara ‘more than likely’ to return from six-game absence tonight

SUNRISE, FL - MARCH 7: Zdeno Chara #33 of the Boston Bruins skates towards the face-off circle during first period action against the Florida Panthers at the BB&T Center on March 7, 2016 in Sunrise, Florida. The Bruins defeated the Panthers 5-4 in overtime. (Photo by Joel Auerbach/Getty Images)
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Bruins captain Zdeno Chara hasn’t been in the lineup since Nov. 22, but that all changes tonight when he returns for a key date against the Panthers at TD Garden.

B’s head coach Claude Julien called it “more than likely probable” (per NHL.com) that Chara will play for the first time since sustaining a lower-body injury six games ago. It’s a huge addition for a Boston defense that has been without its veteran leader and fellow vet John-Michael Liles, who is currently sidelined with a concussion.

As a result of those two injuries, Julien has been rolling with a six-man defensive unit comprised of Torey Krug, Adam McQuaid, Kevan Miller, Brandon Carlo, Joe Morrow and Colin Miller.

Krug saw an upward spike in minutes as a result, and it helped him get his season on track offensively — he has seven points in his last eight games, this after going scoreless through the first nine contests of the year.

Carlo has been receiving big minutes as well. The rookie blueliner played over 24 minutes in back-to-back games against the Flyers and Lightning last week, then had 23:33 in Saturday’s win over Buffalo.

Chara had been averaging just under 23 minutes per prior to getting hurt, so it’s safe to assume Krug and Carlo will go back to more conventional TOI tonight.

Goalie nods: ‘He’s here, he’s able to play, he plays’ — Sens welcome Anderson back versus Pens

DALLAS, TX - NOVEMBER 24:  Craig Anderson #41 of the Ottawa Senators celebrates with Erik Karlsson #65 of the Ottawa Senators after the Senators scored against the Dallas Stars in the third period at American Airlines Center on November 24, 2015 in Dallas, Texas.  (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)
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Craig Anderson, who left the Sens on Nov. 30 to be with his wife while she undergoes cancer treatment, returned to the club ahead of tonight’s game in Pittsburgh.

And even though Anderson’s backup, Mike Condon, is coming off a 24-save shutout of Florida, there was apparently no question about which goalie would face the Pens.

“He’s here,” Sens head coach Guy Boucher said of Anderson, per the club’s Twitter account. “He’s able to play, he plays.”

Anderson has been terrific this season, posting a 12-5-1 record with a .930 save percentage and 2.20 GAA. He was especially dialed in over his last five starts prior to departing, stopping 143 of 153 shots (a .935 save percentage, which “ballooned” mostly due to his final game, a 5-4 loss to Buffalo).

Condon, who had a brief stint in Pittsburgh this season before getting dealt to Ottawa, has performed admirably as well. He’s posted a pair of shutouts and boasts an impressive .946 save percentage on the year. That effort, combined with Anderson’s rock-solid play, has made Andrew Hammond the odd man out in Ottawa (The Hamburglar was reassigned to AHL Binghamton today).

Marc-Andre Fleury will get the nod for Pittsburgh. He’s riding a bit of a hot streak, having stopped 61 of his last 65 shots faced in consecutive victories.

Elsewhere…

— Good matchup in Boston, as Tuukka Rask and the B’s host Roberto Luongo and the Panthers. Rask currently sits third in the NHL with a .941 save percentage, while Luongo is 12th at .929.

Robin Lehner, who returned from a one-game absence to make 31 saves in a loss to Boston on Saturday, starts for the Sabres. The host Capitals will once again turn to their workhorse, Braden Holtby, who looks to snap a three-game losing streak.

— After Mike Smith made a career-high 58 saves in a shootout loss to the Jackets on Saturday, Louis Domingue gives him a breather as the two teams meet again tonight. Sergei Bobrovsky will be in for the Jackets, after Curtis McElhinney got the win over the weekend.

Canucks’ Dorsett to have neck surgery, reportedly done for season

Derek Dorsett, Kyle Brodziak
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The Vancouver Canucks will be without forward Derek Dorsett for a considerable while longer.

The Canucks announced today that Dorsett will undergo “cervical fusion surgery to repair disc degeneration in his neck.” The club expects him to “make a full recovery and return to play,” but no timeline could be provided at this point.

Dorsett’s surgery will be performed by Dr. Robert Watkins of the Marina Del Rey Hospital spine clinic in Los Angeles.

“The decision to perform surgery was made after a thorough review of our options, including non-surgical treatment and rehabilitation,” said GM Jim Benning in a release. “Derek, our Canucks medical team and Dr. [Robert] Watkins believe that surgery offers the best outcome both for his career and long-term health. Derek is an important member of our team and we are optimistic for a full recovery.”

Dorsett last played Nov. 17 against the Coyotes. He was forced to leave the game with what the Canucks called an upper-body injury.

The 29-year-old has one goal and three assists in 14 games this season. He still leads all Vancouver forwards with 35 hits and 33 PIM.

Dorsett is signed through 2018-19 for a cap hit of $2.65 million.

Update:

According to TSN’s Darren Dreger, Dorsett will not be back this season. The hope now is for a return next season.

Coroner concludes Svatos died of drug overdose

DENVER - NOVEMBER 25:  Marek Svatos #40 of the Colorado Avalanche skates during the game against the Nashville Predators at the Pepsi Center on November 25, 2009 in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Doug Pensinger/Getty Images)
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Former Avalanche forward Marek Svatos died early last month of a drug overdose, according to the coroner in Colorado.

The Denver Post is reporting that Svatos “had codeine, morphine and an anti-anxiety medication in his system when he died of combined drug intoxication.” The Douglas County coroner also concluded in its report that Svatos had a history of heroin abuse and depression.

“Drug paraphernalia was found at the scene,” the report said, per the Post.

Svatos was 34 when he died Nov. 5. He last played in the NHL for the Ottawa Senators in 2010-11, before finishing his career overseas.

As reported earlier by the Post, Svatos was living in the Denver area with his wife and two young sons.