Canucks share memories from 14-game trip

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Before the season started, I expected the Flames to take the Northwest division because of Vancouver’s absurd 14-game road streak (lets not even linger upon how wrong I was about Colorado). Even though the giant trip was broken up by the Olympic break, my guess was that would be little solace to Olympians like Roberto Luongo, the Sedin twins and Ryan Kesler.

Clearly, I was dead wrong. The Canucks managed an impressive 8-5-1 record during the road trip and remain atop the Northwest. NHL.com has some really fantastic stuff on the Canucks’ epic road swing. I’ll pick out some of my favorite excerpts to save your delicate, perhaps Constanza-sque hands the beating of all that clicking and scrolling.

One of the better articles I’ve read in quite some time features the reflections of various Canucks players regarding the trip.

BEST CANUCKS SUPPORT

Tanner Glass — “Phoenix is incredible. We would score and it felt like we were at a home game, it was awesome. Lots of kids asking for autographs standing outside in the sun there, it’s nice, people get down there for a vacation and they take in a Canucks game.”

If this article is any indication, Tanner Glass and Darcy Hordichuk are the best quotes on their team. Hordichuk, in particular, sounds like quite the character.

BEST SLEEP

Darcy Hordichuk — “I’m fortunate enough to be a pretty good sleeper, but in Colorado it was the best. You open the windows and get some of that fresh air and you get a view of the mountains and it’s just such peaceful scenery. That’s a city anyone can have a good night’s sleep in.”

BEST MEMORY

Tanner Glass — “It was long, there was a lot of plane rides, a lot of busing and a lot of wake-up calls. That’s probably going to be my biggest memory actually, waking up to Hordi’s chanting every morning, that will stick with me for a while, as much as I’d like to get rid of it. I don’t even know what he is chanting, I don’t think it’s in English, he just wakes up and opens the blinds and lets the sunlight come in and then he yells something in Yiddish or something. That’s my memory.”

Jump for some fascinating stats (and joke stats) from the Canucks’ historic road trip.


Finally, here are some of my favorite factoids from Derek Jory’s “by the numbers” take on the Canucks’ road trip. Again, great job by NHL.com to go beyond the obvious and come up with some really colorful takes on this unusual situation.

  • 42 – Days away from General Motors Place
  • 13 – North American cities visited (Columbus twice)
  • 3 – Time zones visited (9 East, 3 Central, 2 Mountain)
  • -15.8 – Coldest city (in degrees Celsius) visited (Ottawa)
  • +15.5 – Warmest city (in degrees Celsius) visited (Phoenix)
  • 20,737 – Total kilometers traveled (11,608 first half, 9,129 second half)
  • 30 hours, 17 minutes – Total flight time (16:35 first half, 13:42 second half)
  • 7 – Times Darcy Hordichuk sang, “This is the trip that never ends, it just goes on and on my friends…”
  • 28 – Points up for grabs
  • 17 – Points earned
  • 6 – Comeback wins
  • 22,235 – Highest attendance (Chicago)
  • 12,861 – Lowest attendance (Colorado)
  • 0 – Times Daniel Sedin pretended to be twin brother Henrik or vice versa
  • 2,520 – Facebook status updates, in millions, by users since the Canucks left

(H/T to Alix Wright from Canucks Hockey Blog)

Sullivan calls it a ‘blindside hit to the head,’ but Marleau doesn’t think suspension’s coming

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PITTSBURGH — It didn’t take long for the first controversial incident of the Stanley Cup Final.

Patrick Marleau‘s illegal check to the head on Bryan Rust — one that earned Marleau a minor penalty, and forced Rust to exit the game — left Rust day-to-day with an upper-body injury, per Pens head coach Mike Sullivan.

When asked what he thought of the hit, Sullivan was blunt.

“It’s a blindside hit to the head,” he said. “[Marleau] gets a penalty and I’m sure the league will look at it.”

Marleau wasn’t saying much about the incident following the game, but did suggest he wasn’t expecting supplemental discipline:

“I just tried to keep everything down,” Marleau added. “I didn’t want to get too high on him.”

It’ll be interesting to see what transpires. There hasn’t been a suspension in the Stanley Cup Final since Vancouver’s Aaron Rome was given a four-game ban for his massive hit on Boston forward Nathan Horton.

Marleau has no history with the NHL’s Department of Player Safety.

It should be mentioned the DoPS has been fairly active this spring, handing down five suspensions, including a pair of three-gamers to Brooks Orpik and Brayden Schenn.

Bonino scores late, role guys star again as Pens take Game 1

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PITTSBURGH — If this playoff run has proven anything, it’s that the Penguins are more than Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin.

Tonight only reaffirmed it.

Bryan Rust, Conor Sheary and Nick Bonino did all the scoring on Monday, with Bonino’s late marker the winner as Pittsburgh defeated San Jose 3-2 in Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final.

Bonino’s goal, his fourth of the playoffs, came with just over two minutes remaining, capping off a quality opener in which both teams carried play for long stretches.

Rust and Sheary punctuated a dominant opening period for the Penguins — they out-shot the Sharks 15-4 — but the Sharks replied with a stellar second frame, equalizing on goals from Tomas Hertl and Patrick Marleau.

That set the stage for a dramatic third, and the Bonino goal.

That he, Rust and Sheary did the scoring for Pittsburgh was fitting. There’d been plenty of talk heading into this series about role players coming up large, to the point where the American Hockey League sent out a press release noting that 23 of 25 Penguins that’ve played in the playoffs thus far came through Wilkes-Barre/Scranton, highlighting this spring’s “big four” of Rust, Sheary, Tom Kuhnhackl and Matt Murray.

Rust etched himself into Pittsburgh lore in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference Final, scoring both goals in a 2-1 win over the Lightning.

Murray’s exploits are pretty well-known. The 22-year-old was remarkably solid after regaining the starter’s net from Marc-Andre Fleury in Game 6 of the ECF, stopping 44 of 47 shots over the final two games of the series.

He was good again on Monday, with 24 saves on 26 shots.

Sheary, the diminutive speedster, scored his third goal of the playoffs tonight. Kuhnhackl tied a team high with eight hits.

As such, Pittsburgh has to be thrilled about how tonight went. They held up home ice and got contributions from across the board — the only downer has to be the health of Rust, who twice exited the contest after taking a hit to the head from Marleau.

As for the Sharks… well, this one will sting a bit. The club did remarkably well to rally from a two-goal deficit and carried play in the second period, but can’t be pleased.

They were beaten in the possession game and out-shot badly (41-26), things head coach Peter DeBoer wanted to control against Pittsburgh, a team he considers the fastest in the league.

That said, there are positives moving forward. Martin Jones was outstanding in his Stanley Cup Final debut, with 38 saves on 41 shots, and there’s still a chance to get the split on Wednesday night.

Of course, to do that, the Sharks will have to figure out how to slow down Pittsburgh’s role players.

Video: Patrick Marleau gets minor penalty for hit on Bryan Rust

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Patrick Marleau made a big impact with the 2-2 goal in Game 1, yet a hit he delivered on Bryan Rust might draw more attention.

With the score tied 2-2, Marleau was whistled for a minor penalty for “illegal check to the head” on Rust. The Pittsburgh Penguins power play was not able to score on the San Jose Sharks during that two-minute power play.

Rust left the bench for a short period of time, yet he returned to action.

Some believe that Marleau deserves a look from the Department of Player Safety for the check. Others wonder if it should have been a penalty at all.

Watch the video above and check out the GIFs below to decide for yourself:

Sharks flip the script, tie Penguins heading into third period

PITTSBURGH, PA - MAY 30:  Tomas Hertl #48 of the San Jose Sharks celebrates with teammates after scoring a second period goal against Matt Murray #30 of the Pittsburgh Penguins (not pictured) in Game One of the 2016 NHL Stanley Cup Final at Consol Energy Center on May 30, 2016 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)
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The Pittsburgh Penguins dominated the San Jose Sharks in the first period of Game 1, no doubt about it.

Even so, the Sharks entered the middle frame down 2-0, and responded rather than shriveling up. They basically switched roles with the Penguins in the second period, ultimately tying things up 2-2.

The first goal was one Matt Murray would probably like back (even more than a goalie would want any goal back, mind you), as Tomas Hertl beat him five-hole for a power-play goal.

Witness the Sharks’ first-ever goal in a Stanley Cup Final:

Fittingly, a grizzled veteran and longtime face of the Sharks’ franchise tied it up, as Patrick Marleau made it 2-2 with a clever wraparound:

Which team will win the third period? Could we see overtime? Find out on NBC.