Peter Chiarelli speaks on the Cooke non-suspension


This isn’t going away anytime soon so we might as well keep covering

In the wake of the non-suspension news surrounding the Matt
Cooke hit, as well as the news that the NHL GM’s have proposed rule
changes that would make such hits illegal, players and coaches around
the NHL are weighing in with their thoughts on the situation.

Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli, no doubt one of the most
outspoken in this week’s meetings, had some very choice words during a
conference call yesterday.

“I was bewildered that there wasn’t a penalty called.

“There’s no reason to believe [the league] is targeting us. We can go
and look at other teams and see what infractions have happened to other
teams. You’ll have the same or close to the same as far as major
penalties and injuries that have been caused. I have no reason to
believe [the NHL] is targeting us.

momentum that’s been building since the Richards/Booth hit. I felt if
they set aside the existing parameters that there wouldn’t a compromise
to the [discipline] system.

“I’m really disappointed. What’s fair? There’s no due process. I got
there Sunday night and I was speaking to Collie and his staff right up
until when I left [Wednesday] at noon. I was heard if that’s part of
fairness, and I guess there was an element of fairness there.”

Obviously there’s some emotions involved on the Bruins side, as Cooke
is still playing and Savard is at home with the lights off and the
curtains drawn.

But I doubt the NHL is actively targeting any team in this situation.

It’s not as if Cooke wasn’t a repeat offender, whom the league is
always quick to come down harder on than anyone else. And while Savard
isn’t exactly a “superstar”, he’s far from a nameless player on a
small-market team. The NHL maintains they had no choice not to suspend
Cooke based on the precedent set forth earlier this season, and the
simple fact that there wasn’t a rule in place he broke.

Jason Demers tweets #FreeTorres, gets mocked

Los Angeles Kings v San Jose Sharks - Game One

Following his stunning 41-game suspension, it looks like Raffi Torres has at least one former teammate in his corner.

We haven’t yet seen how the San Jose Sharks or the NHLPA are reacting to the league’s hammer-dropping decision to punish Torres for his Torres-like hit on Jakob Silfverberg, but Jason Demers decided to put in a good word for Torres tonight.

It was a simple message: “#FreeTorres.”

Demers, now of the Dallas Stars, was once with Torres and the Sharks. (In case this post’s main image didn’t make that clear enough already.)

Perhaps this will become “a thing” at some point.

So far, it seems like it’s instead “a thing (that people are making fun of).”

… You get the idea.

The bottom line is that there are some who either a) blindly support Torres because they’re Sharks fans or b) simply think that the punishment was excessive.

The most important statement came from the Department of Player Safety, though.

Bruins list Chara on IR, for now

Zdeno Chara

Those who feel as though the Boston Bruins may rebound – John Tortorella, maybe? – likely rest some of their optimism on the back of a healthy Zdeno Chara.

It’s possible that he’s merely limping into what may otherwise be a healthy 2015-16 season, but it’s definitely looking like a slow start thanks to a lower-body injury.

The latest sign of a bumpy beginning came on Monday, as several onlookers (including’s Joe Haggerty) pointed out that Chara was listed on injured reserve.

As Haggerty notes, that move is retroactive to Sept. 24, so his status really just opens up options for the Bruins.

Still … it’s a little unsettling, isn’t it?

The Bruins likely realize that they need to transition away from their generational behemoth, but last season provided a stark suggestion that may not be ready yet. Trading Dougie Hamilton and losing Dennis Seidenberg to injury only make them more dependent on the towering 38-year-old.

This isn’t really something to panic about, yet it might leave a few extra seats open on the Bruins’ bandwagon.