There's nothing wrong with Chicago anthem tradition

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I don’t why this is being brought up now — unless he never thought
about it until Sunday’s game on NBC — but one Detroit blogger is
unhappy with the tradition that takes place at every game at the United
Center: the fans cheering their heads off during the Star-Spangled

In case you didn’t know, this is something that has been
going on at all Chicago games since the 1980’s. During the anthem for
the 1991 All-Star Game, the Chicago crowd showcased their
pride and enthusiasm in front of a national audience
. Yet Rob Otto
is unhappy with it and
believes it should stop.

I understand it is a very difficult song, and many Americans feel
embarrassed to sing it in public.  However, if you’re not signing you
should at least stand in silent reverence until it is completed. 

The Chicago fans are doing the exact opposite. 

Their argument is that they are being more patriotic — that
yelling and screaming makes them a part of the anthem instead of just
being a silent bystander.  I am not buying it.

First of all, I don’t believe for one second that Americans are
embarrassed to sing the anthem in public. In fact, there is no greater
tradition than joining in with other fans in singing along before a
sports game, and I love it each time. Is the cheering during the anthem
in Chicago different? Of course, but I don’t believe it to be as
offensive as it’s being made out to be.

Full disclosure: I’ve spent the past ten years in the United States
Navy. I’ve witnessed the rise and fall of patriotism across this country
over that time, and I have no issue whatsoever with what the fans are
doing in Chicago. They’re not disrespecting our country or the anthem;
in fact, it’s refreshing to see Americans still taking an active role
and being patriotic. I’m personally tired of how passive we are during a
time that is meant for reverence and patriotism and I wish more people
would take an active role in the anthem. Whether that’s enthusiastically
singing along or cheering on your country while it’s being performed,
I’m all for it.

I don’t want to turn this into a political debate, but if the worse
thing we’re doing is cheering during the anthem then we must be doing
something right.

Lucic: If I wanted to hurt Couture, ‘I would have hurt him’


Last night in Los Angeles, Kings forward Milan Lucic received a match penalty after skating the entire width of the ice to give San Jose’s Logan Couture a two-hand shove to the face.

Lucic didn’t hurt Couture, who had caught Lucic with an open-ice hit that Lucic didn’t like. Couture’s smiling, mocking face was good evidence that the Sharks’ forward was going to be OK.

This morning, Lucic was still in disbelief that he was penalized so harshly.

“I didn’t cross any line,” Lucic said, per Rich Hammond of the O.C. Register. “Believe me, if my intentions were to hurt him, I would have hurt him.”

While Lucic knew he deserved a penalty, he said after the game that he didn’t “know why it was called a match penalty.” His coach, Darryl Sutter, agreed, calling it “a borderline even roughing penalty.”

And though former NHL referee Kerry Fraser believes a match penalty was indeed warranted, Lucic said this morning that he hasn’t heard from the NHL about any possible supplemental discipline.

Nor for that matter has Dustin Brown, after his high hit on Couture in the first period.

In conclusion, it’s good to have hockey back.

Related: Sutter says Kings weren’t ‘interested’ in checking the Sharks

Torres apologizes to Silfverberg and Sharks


A statement from Raffi Torres:

“I accept the 41-game suspension handed down to me by the NHL’s Department of Player Safety. I worked extremely hard over the last two years following reconstructive knee surgery to resume my NHL career, and this is the last thing I wanted to happen. I am disappointed I have put myself in a position to be suspended again. I sincerely apologize to Jakob for the hit that led to this suspension, and I’m extremely thankful that he wasn’t seriously injured as a result of the play. I also want to apologize to my Sharks teammates and the organization.”

A statement from San Jose GM Doug Wilson:

“The Sharks organization fully supports the NHL’s supplementary discipline decision regarding Raffi. While we do not believe there was any malicious intent, this type of hit is unacceptable and has no place in our game. There is a difference between playing hard and crossing the line and there is no doubt, in this instance, Raffi crossed that line. We’re very thankful that Jakob was not seriously injured as a result of this play.”

Silfverberg says he expects to play Saturday when the Ducks open their regular season Saturday in San Jose.