Record day high on quantity, low on quality

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I’m counting on no more trades coming across, as it seems that things have finally quieted down. But the 2010 NHL Trade Deadline was about as anticlimactic as you could get after two weeks of build up of all the talk that’s supposedly been going down between the GM’s across the NHL. That’s not to say there haven’t been a number of trades, because the at last count 52 players and 25 draft picks were exchanged throughout 31 trades. By our estimation that’s a record for total trades at the deadline.

Yet the biggest trade of them all, the biggest name involved was Lubomir Visnovsky, when Edmonton exchanged him with Anaheim for Ryan Whitney. That was it. Some would say (me included) that best trade at the deadline actually happened yesterday, when Alexei Ponikarovsky was traded from Toronto to Pittsburgh.

So why the letdown of a day? Where were the big trades for starting goaltenders or big-name defensemen (besides Visnovsky), or the insane multi-player trades that changes the complexion of a playoff race or the direction of a team? What led to the dearth of big trades?

For one, you’d have to point to the fact that in reality there were two trade deadlines; the one today on March 3rd and the one right before the Olympic break and the NHL roster freeze. You could say that the biggest trade of the year already happened, when the Ilya Kovalchuk sweepstakes was won by the New Jersey Devils. The Dallas Stars made a surprising trade when they acquired Kari Lehtonen from the Thrashers. But since the deadline was essentially spread out three weeks with a break in between the buildup to today was a bit rushed as we all struggled to recover from the Olympics.

But could this also be a sign of free agency and the salary cap truly causing havoc with the major deadline deals we’ve seen in the past? Sure, there was an absurdly high amount of trades but 90% of those involved draft picks or prospects. The assets just were not there across the NHL to justify teams parting with their big name pieces.

Philadelphia was reportedly hungry for Dan Hamhuis, Dwayne Roloson and Tomas Vokoun, yet failed to acquire anyone because they just couldn’t match the prices teams were asking for. The Flyers were handcuffed by the number of valuable players on the team with no trade clauses, who most likely weren’t willing to waive their clause to go from Philly to Florida or Long Island. Broad Street Hockey breaks it down:

With Tomas Vokoun, it came out that Panthers
general manager Randy Sexton wasn’t shopping the goaltender but that
they were listening to offers that came in. The Flyers reportedly made
one of those offers, but Sexton apparently asked for Jeff Carter. Holmgren stuck to his guns on
Carter by not trading him away, but subsequent offers of Scott Hartnell or Simon Gagne were tough because each player has
a no-trade clause.

Vokoun would have waived his NTC to come to Philadelphia, but it’s
hard to believe Hartnell or Gagne would do the same to go to Florida.
Again, no-trade clauses bit the Flyers in the rear. Vokoun wasn’t moved
before the deadline.

There is an increasingly high number of NTC’s being handed out across the NHL and you could really see that hamper team’s actions today. Ray Whitney was willing to be traded but only if he was able to sign a contract extension with his new team. Tomas Kaberle will be traded this summer, but wanted to stick it out this season and the Leafs kept him.

Judging by the assets that the Leafs got back for their other trades, I can guarantee you there were a number of teams calling about Kaberle. “We’ll give you two hot dog vendors, new light bulbs for the jumbotron and a 2nd round draft pick”.

So instead of trades involving multiple players, we saw an abnormally high amount of players traded for high draft picks. In fact, you’d think that a second-round pick is the most valuable form of currency in the NHL after today.

So whether it was the split deadline, a disappointing lack of big name players made available or the fact that the salary cap is holding teams back, March 3rd, 2010 was just as boring as it could be.

Kings GM says Mike Richards went into ‘a destructive spiral’

Mike Richards

The Los Angeles Kings may owe Mike Richards money until 2031 (seriously), but in settling his grievance, the team and player more or less get to turn the page.

Not before Kings GM Dean Lombardi shares his sometimes startling perspective, though.

Lombardi has a tendency to be candid, especially in the press release-heavy world of sports management. Even by his standards, his account of Richards’ “destructive sprial” is a staggering read from the Los Angeles Times’ Lisa Dillman.

“Without a doubt, the realization of what happened to Mike Richards is the most traumatic episode of my career,” Lombardi said in a written summation he provided to the Los Angeles Times. “At times, I think that I will never recover from it. It is difficult to trust anyone right now – and you begin to question whether you can trust your own judgment. The only thing I can think of that would be worse would be suspecting your wife of cheating on you for five years and then finding out in fact it was true.”

Lombardi provides plenty of eyebrow-raising statements to Dillman, including:

  • He believed he “found his own Derek Jeter” in Richards, a player who “at one time symbolized everything that was special about the sport.”
  • Lombardi remarked that “his production dropped 50 percent and the certain ‘it’ factor he had was vaporizing in front of me daily.”
  • The Kings GM believes that he was “played” by Richards.

… Yeah.

Again, it’s a powerful read that you should soak in yourself, even if you’re unhappy with the way the Kings handled the situation.

Maybe the most pressing of many lingering questions is: will we get to hear Richards’ side of the story?

Coyotes exploit another lousy outing from Quick

Jonathan Quick
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Despite owning two Stanley Cup rings, there are a healthy number of people who aren’t wild about Jonathan Quick.

Those people might feel validated through the Los Angeles Kings’ first two games, as he followed a rough loss to the San Jose Sharks with a true stinker against the Arizona Coyotes on Friday.

Sometimes a goalie has a bad night stats-wise, yet his team is as much to blame as anything else. You can probably pin this one on Quick, who allowed four goals on just 14 shots through the first two periods.

Things died down in the final frame, but let’s face it; slowing things down is absolutely the Coyotes’ design with a 4-1 lead (which ultimately resulted in a 4-1 win).


A soft 1-0 goal turned out to be a sign of things to come:

Many expected the Kings to roar into this second game after laying an egg in their opener. Instead, the Coyotes exploited Quick’s struggles for a confidence-booster, which included key prospect Max Domi scoring a goal and an assist.

It’s worth mentioning that Mike Smith looked downright fantastic at times, only drawing more attention to Quick’s struggles.


After a troubled summer and a failed 2014-15 season, Los Angeles was likely eager to start things off the right way.

Instead, they instead will likely focus on the fact that they merely dropped two (ugly) games.